Posts Tagged political economy of punishment

The Political Economy of Punishment: New book co-edited by José Ángel Brandariz

Thursday, December 7th, 2017

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[ENG] The London-based publisher Routledge has just published the book The Political Economy of Punishment Today: Visions, debates and challenges. This book has been co-edited by the ECRIM member José Ángel Brandariz, together with Dario Melossi (University of Bologna, Italy) and Máximo Sozzo (National University of the Litoral, Argentina). This book includes an article authored by Patricia Faraldo, as well as another one written by José Ángel Brandariz. This book has been edited based on the lectures and talks given within an international conference on the political economy of punishment, which was held at the University of A Coruna in September 2014.

INTRODUCTION: Over the last fifteen years, the analytical field of punishment and society
has witnessed an increase of research developing the connection
between economic processes and the evolution of penality from
different standpoints, focusing particularly on the increase of rates of
incarceration in relation to the transformations of neoliberal capitalism.
Bringing together leading researchers from diverse geographical
contexts, this book reframes the theoretical field of the political
economy of punishment, analysing penality within the current
economic situation and connecting contemporary penal changes with
political and cultural processes. It challenges the traditional and
common sense understanding of imprisonment as ‘exclusion’ and posits
a more promising concept of imprisonment as a ‘differential’ or
‘subordinate’ form of ‘inclusion’.
This groundbreaking book will be a key text for scholars who are
working in the field of punishment and society as well as reaching a
broader audience within law, sociology, economics, criminology and
criminal justice studies.

TABLE OF CONTENTS:
The Political Economy of Punishment Today: An Introduction
(José A. Brandariz-García, Dario Melossi and Máximo Sozzo; 1.
Between Struggles and Discipline: Marx and Foucault on
Penality and the Critique of Political Economy (Dario Melossi;
2. The Renaissance of The Political Economy of Punishment
from a Comparative Perspective (Máximo Sozzo; 3. For and
Against the Political Economy of Punishment: Thoughts on
Bourdieu and Punishment (Ignacio González-Sánchez; 4. Do
Economic Depressions Reduce the Use of Fines? Revisiting
Rusche and Kirchheimer’s Punishment and Social Structure
(Patricia Faraldo Cabana; 5. From One Recession to Another:
The Lessons of a Long-Term Political Economy of Punishment.
The Example of Belgium (1830-2014) (Charlotte Vanneste; 6.
Political Economy and Punishment in Australia (Hilde Tubex;
7. Punishment in A Hybrid Political Economy: The Italian Case
(1970-2010) (Zelia A. Gallo; 8. ‘A Return to Gulags’? Explaining
Trends in Post-Soviet Prison Rates (Gavin Slade; 9. Inclusion’s
Dark Side: The Political Economy of Irregular Migration in
Greece (Leonidas K. Cheliotis) ; 10. Reflections on Spanish
Policies of Migration Control: A Political Economic Reading
on the Punishment of Migrants (José Ángel Brandariz-García;
Index

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Upcoming Conference: ‘Crises, Economy and Punishment: The Influence of the Great Recession on Crime and Penality’

Tuesday, July 12th, 2016

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[ENG] On 15-16 September, the Law School of the University of A Coruna will host the International Conference ‘Crises, Economy and Punishment: The Influence of the Great Recession on Crime and Penality‘, organised by the ECRIM together with Professor Russell Hogg (Queensland University of Technology, Australia) and Professor Máximo Sozzo (National University of the Litoral, Argentina). The Conference will encompass some 50 lectures and presentations of scholars coming from a dozen countries, that will reflect on the influence of the economic crisis on crime and penality.

Please see below the final programme of the Conference:

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International Conference ‘The political economy of punishment today: Visions, debates and challenges’

Tuesday, September 23rd, 2014

2014-09-18 10.08.12

General overview

On September 18-19 the Law School of the University of A Coruna hosted and International Conference, entitled ‘The political economy of punishment today: Visions, debates and challenges’. The Conference was organised by the ECRIM, under the academic coordination of José Ángel Brandariz (University of A Coruna, Spain), Dario Melossi (University of Bologna, Italy) and Máximo Sozzo (National University of the Litoral, Argentina).

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Dario Melossi

The Conference began with a lecture given by Dario Melossi (University of Bologna, Italy). His lecture, entitled ‘The Prison and the Factory revisited: The Cycle of the Canaille’, worked as a general introduction to the topics of the Conference.

Dario Melossi’s lecture was ensued by a first panel session, named ‘Political Economy of Punishment Issues I’, which encompassed two presentations.

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Diego Zysman

On the one hand, Diego Zysman (University of Buenos Aires, Argentina) reflected on ‘Political Economy, Democracy, and punitivism in Argentina’.

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Daniel Jiménez

On the other hand, Daniel Jiménez Franco (University of Zaragoza, Spain), to a certain degree mirroring the perspective of his Argentinean counterpart, gave a talk on ‘Political Economy, Democracy, and punitivism in Spain’.

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Alessandro De Giorgi

The panel session was followed by a lecture given by Alessandro de Giorgi (State University of San Jose, USA). The California-based scholar lectured on ‘Beyond Determinism: Towards a Cultural Political Economy of Punishment in Late Capitalism’.

The Conference resumed in the afternoon of September 18 with a panel session on ‘Political Economy of Punishment Issues II’. The panel session began with a talk given by José Ángel Brandariz (University of A Coruna, Spain), who presented a paper named ‘The punishment of migrants and the Political Economy of Punishment’.

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Ignacio González

Thereafter, Ignacio González Sánchez, from the Complutense University of Madrid, Spain, completed the panel session by giving a talk on ‘Neoliberal policies and the expansion of State punishment’.

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Charlotte Vanneste

A lecture given by Charlotte Vanneste (National Institute of Criminalistics and Criminology, and University of Liège, Belgium) ensued the second panel session. The Belgian scholar reflected on ‘From one recession to another: the lessons of a long-term political economy of punishment’.

The first day of the Conference ended with a panel session on ‘Punishment and Political Economy’, which included three presentations.

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Patricia Faraldo

The first paper was presented by Patricia Faraldo (University of A Coruna, Spain), who also was the chair of the organising committee of the Conference. Her paper was entitled ‘Who dares fine a murderer? Fines and the changing meaning of money in criminal law’.

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Mariel Muraro

The second paper of the panel session, sinthetically named ‘Underclass’, was presented by the Brazilian scholar Mariel Muraro (State University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil).

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Kerry Carrington

Finally, the panel session was closed by a talk given by Kerry Carrington (Queensland University of Technology, Australia). The well-known Australian scholar reflected on ‘Youth Justice, Boot Camps and the Return of the Retributive Justice: The peculiar political economy of punishment in an Australian jurisdiction’.

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Leonidas Cheliotis

The second day of the Conference began with a lecture given by Leonidas Cheliotis (London School of Economics, England, UK). The London-based scholar presented a paper on ‘The Limits of Inclusion: Globalisation, Neoliberalism and State Policies of Border Control’.

A first panel session on ‘Penality Issues’ followed Leonidas Cheliotis’ presentation.

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Hilde Tubex

The panel session was opened by a paper presented by Hilde Tubex (University of Western Australia, Australia), who reflected on ‘Analysing levels of punishment in Australia’.

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Gavin Slade

Geographically shifting the viewpoint, Gavin Slade, from the Free University of Berlin, Germany, presented a paper on ‘Punishment in the Post-soviet Region’.

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Ignacio Mendiola

The panel session was closed by a talk given by Ignacio Mendiola (University of the Basque Country, Spain) and entitled ‘The capture of space: From precarity to inhabitability’.

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From left to right: Máximo Sozzo, Eva Souto, Cristina Fernández Bessa, Ana Neira, David Castro, Ignacio González Sánchez, and Gavin Slade

The morning session of September 19 also hosted a lecture given by Máximo Sozzo (National University of the Litoral, Argentina), in which the Argentinean scholar discussed the topics of political economy of punishment by presenting a paper named ‘Economy, politics and punishment: between ‘why’ and ‘how’ questions’.

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Ana Ballesteros

A second panel session on ‘Penality Issues’ ensued. The first paper of the panel was presented by Ana Ballesteros (University of Barcelona, Spain), who reflected on ‘Respectful moduled (módulos de respeto) in the Spanish Penitentiary System from a gender perspective: Research approach and preliminary results’.

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From left to right: Dimitris Koros, Sofia Spyrea, and Nikolaos Koulouris

The second talk of the panel session was given by three scholars of the Democritus University of Thrace, Greece: Nikolaos Koulouris, Dimitris Koros, and Sofia Spyrea. The greek researchers presented a paper on ‘Inequalities in Punishment: Imprisonment, Community Service and Electronic Monitoring in Greece’.

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Ana Neira

The panel session also included a presentation given by a researcher affliated to the University of A Coruna, Spain: Ana Neira, who reflected on ‘The neoliberal criminal policy as a source of impunity for large corporations. The perverse logic of ‘too big to jail’.

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Richard Sparks

The Conference was closed by a final lecture, given by Richard Sparks (University of Edinburgh, Scotland, UK). As a best final talk of the Conference, the UK scholar presented a paper entitled ‘Anti-politics, penal politics and questions of legitimation’.

International Conference: ‘The political economy of punishment today’. Call for Papers

Wednesday, March 26th, 2014

The political economy of punishment today:

Visions, debates and challenges

International two-day conference

18-19 September 2014

Law School, University of A Coruna

A Coruna, Spain

 

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

Over the last decade, several key texts have sought to examine the recent transformations of penality, most prominently among them mass imprisonment, through Political Economy conceptual tools. Hence, this literature, which is fairly heterogeneous both in perspectives and conclusions, contributed to updating the theoretical framework of Political Economy of Punishment, which was crucial to reframing critical thought on punishment in the 1970s and 1980s. Moreover, those recent works have coincided with the unfolding of a theoretical line aimed at explaining the rise of punitiveness of the last decades from the standpoint of the rise of neoliberalism, understood both as a political project and as an economic doxa. By contrast, another prominent body of literature has tended to emphasise the cultural and/or political components of the evolution of penality – and hence its variability – to some extent side-lining the political economic analysis.

Taking account of this theoretical context, it appears to be particularly timely to reflect on the current condition of the analytical field of the Political Economy of Punishment from the plural perspectives that arose from these new contributions on the subject.

First, the Conference aims to debate whether those recent texts are shaping new theoretical tools for the political economic analysis of punishment. Second, the Conference seeks to analyse whether and how the recent Political Economy of Punishment literature may be related to the texts on neoliberalism and punishment and to those which are focused on the cultural and political elements of the contemporary penal trends. Last, but not least, the Conference is aimed at examining to what extent the Political Economy of Punishment literature may contribute to critically analyse the evolution of penality since the onset of the so-called Great Recession.

Therefore, we will consider contributions on a wide range of issues that encompass the broad theme of The political economy of punishment today: Visions, debates and challenges, particularly on the themes of:

 

  • Variants of capitalism and punishment: versions and relations
  • Contemporary transformations of capitalism and penality: postfordism, neoliberalism, etc.
  • Great Recession and penal policies
  • Econonmy, culture, politics and punishment: Theoretical tools, dialogues and conflicts

 

 

Keynote speakers:

Leonidas Cheliotis (University of Edinburgh, Scotland, UK)

Alessandro De Giorgi (San Jose State University, USA)

Dario Melossi (University of Bologna, Italy)

Máximo Sozzo (National University of the Litoral, Argentina)

Richard Sparks (University of Edinburgh, Scotland, UK)

 

Organization:

ECRIM, University of A Coruna, Spain (www.ecrim.es)

Academic chairs: José Ángel Brandariz (University of A Coruna, Spain), Máximo Sozzo (National University of the Litoral, Argentina) and Dario Melossi (University of Bologna, Italy)

Organizing committee chair: Patricia Faraldo (University of A Coruna, Spain)

 

Abstract guidelines:

Proposals should be titled and should not exceed 250 words. Please include the proposer’s name and contact details along with his or her university affiliation.

Please submit abstracts via email to: dcastrolinares@gmail.com

The papers presented at the workshop may be eventually published in a book containing the workshop proceedings.

 

Closing date: 15 June 2014

Decisions about the acceptance of the papers will be made by the end of June 2014.

 

 

 

 

The political economy of punishment today:

Visions, debates and challenges

Congreso Internacional

18-19 de septiembre de 2014

Facultad de Derecho, Universidad de A Coruña

A Coruña, España

 

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

A lo largo de la última década, una pluralidad de textos ha intentado analizar las recientes transformaciones de la penalidad, en particular el encarcelamiento masivo, a través de herramientas conceptuales de la Economía política. Esta literatura, que es claramente heterogénea tanto en perspectivas como en conclusiones, ha contribuido a actualizar el marco teórico de la Economía política de la pena, que fue capital para relanzar el pensamiento crítico sobre la pena en los años 70 y 80. A mayor abundamiento, estos textos recientes han coincidido en el tiempo con el desarrollo de una línea teórica que pretende explicar el incremento de la punitividad de las últimas décadas desde el punto de vista de la emergencia del neoliberalismo, entendido como proyecto político y como doxa económica. Frente a ello, otro sector relevante de la literatura académica ha tendido a enfatizar los elementos culturales y/o políticos de la evolución de la penalidad –así como sus variaciones-, marginando en cierta medida el análisis de  Economía política.

Partiendo de este contexto teórico, resulta especialmente oportuno reflexionar sobre la actual situación del campo analítico de la Economía política de la pena, desde las perspectivas plurales que surgen de estas nuevas aportaciones en la materia.

Por ello, el Congreso pretende discutir si tales textos recientes están conformando nuevos instrumentos teóricos para el análisis económico-político de la pena. En segundo lugar, el Congreso analizará si -y cómo- puede ponerse en relación la literatura reciente sobre Economía política de la pena con los textos sobre neoliberalismo y penalidad y con los que se centran en los componentes culturales y políticos de las tendencias punitivas contemporáneas. Por último, el Congreso pretende reflexionar sobre en qué medida la literatura sobre Economía política de la pena puede contribuir a analizar críticamente la evolución de la penalidad desde el inicio de la denominada Gran Recesión.

En consonancia con todo ello, se tomarán en consideración contribuciones centradas en un diversas cuestiones que se integran en el amplio marco de The political economy of punishment today: Visions, debates and challenges, en particular en los siguientes temas:

·         Variantes del capitalismo y penalidad: versiones e interrelaciones

·         Transformaciones contemporáneas del capitalismo y penalidad: postfordismo, neoliberalismo, etc.

·         Gran Recesión y políticas punitivas

·         Economía, cultura y pena: herramientas teóricas, diálogos y conflictos

 

Keynote speakers:

Leonidas Cheliotis (Universidad de Edimburgo, Escocia, Reino Unido)

Alessandro De Giorgi (Universidad estatal de San Jose, EE.UU.)

Dario Melossi (Universidad de Bolonia, Italia)

Máximo Sozzo (Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Argentina)

Richard Sparks (Universidad de Edimburgo, Escocia, Reino Unido)

 

Organización:

ECRIM, Universidad de A Coruña, España (www.ecrim.es)

Coordinadores académicos: José Ángel Brandariz (Universidad de A Coruña, España), Máximo Sozzo (Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Argentina) y Dario Melossi (Universidad de Bolonia, Italia)

Coordinadora del comité organizador: Patricia Faraldo (Universidad de A Coruña, España)

 

Instrucciones para los resúmenes de los textos:

Las propuestas deben tener título, y no deben exceder de 250 palabras. Deben incluirse el nombre del proponente, así como los datos de contacto y la universidad de pertenencia.

Los resúmenes de los textos deben enviarse por correo-e a: dcastrolinares@gmail.com

Los textos presentados en el seminario pueden ser ulteriormente publicados en un libro que contenga los resultados del Congreso.

 

Fecha límite: 15 de junio de 2014.

La decisión sobre la aceptación de los textos se tomará a fines de junio de 2014.

 

International Conference “Beyond Neoliberalism? Politics and Punishment in Contemporary Societies”

Monday, October 7th, 2013

The Law School of the University of A Coruña hosted on 3-4 October an International Conference, organised by the ECRIM research group and entitled “Beyond Neoliberalism? Politics and Punishment in Contemporary Societies”.

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From left to right, Máximo Sozzo, Richard Sparks

The first day of the Conference (Thursday, October the 3rd) began with a lecture given by Richard Sparks (University of Edinburgh, UK), entitled “What’s going on? Some legitimation problems of the ‘neo-liberal’ penality”.

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From left to right, José Ángel Brandariz, David Vila, Manuel Maroto, Máximo Sozzo

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From left to right, David Vila, David Soto, José Ángel Brandariz, Máximo Sozzo

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From left to right, Ignacio Mendiola, José Ángel Brandariz

Richard Sparks’ lecture was followed by a panel session on “Sovereignty, Governmentaly and Punishment”. The panel began with a presentation given written by David San Martín (University of La Rioja, Spain) and David Vila (University of Zaragoza, Spain) on “Austere Government and Mundane Sovereignty”. Then David Soto (University of A Coruña, Spain) presented a paper written by Borxa Colmenero (University of A Coruña, Spain) on “Bio-politics and sovereign power in Spain: Continuities and discontinuities in the new political cycle”. The session also hosted a presentation given by Ignacio Mendiola (University of the Basque Country, Spain) on “The role of torture in the neoliberal regime” (Presentation).

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From left to right, Luz María Puente, Emma Bell

The Conference continued with a lecture given by Emma Bell (University of Savoy, France) reflecting on “There is an alternative: Challenging the logic of neoliberal punishment”.

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From left to right, Luz María Puente, Daniel Jiménez

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Among others, Luz María Puente, José Ángel Brandariz, Máximo Sozzo, from left to right

A panel session on “Great Recession and Criminal Justice” followed Emma Bell’s lecture. A presentation on “Punish and discipline? Penitentiary Jubilee and extended expulsion in the Iberian neo-liberalism”, given by Daniel Jiménez Franco (University of Zaragoza, Spain), opened the panel. Then José Ángel Brandariz (University of A Coruña, Spain) presented a paper on “Great Recession and Criminal Justice: Bad times for criticism?” (Presentation).

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From left to right, Luz María Puente, Alejandro Forero, Rita Faria

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From left to right, Luz María Puente, Claudio González, Rita Faria

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From left to right, Luz María Puente, Rita Faria, Claudio González

The first day of the Conference finished with a third panel session, entitled “Neoliberal Penality, Social Harm and Economic Crime”. The panel hosted a presentation given by Alejandro Forero (University of Barcelona, Spain) on “New ‘crisis’ and the production of harm: Which ungovernability?”. Then Claudio González (University of Malaga, Spain) lectured on “The influence of neoliberalism in Latin America’s criminal justice systems: The construction of a managerial paradigm in Chile and Costa Rica”. Finally, Rita Faria (University of Porto, Portugal) closed the panel presenting a paper on “Crisis, crime and criminology: Reflection on harms caused by the economic crisis and economic crimes in Portugal”.

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From left to right, Patricia Faraldo, José Ángel Brandariz, Leonidas Cheliotis, Máximo Sozzo

The second day of the Conference began with a lecture given by Leonidas Cheliotis (University of Edinburgh, UK), entitled “Pessimism of the Intellect, Optimism of the Will: Redefining the Contours of Neoliberal Penality”.

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From left to right, Ignacio González, Máximo Sozzo

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From left to right, Manuel Maroto, Ignacio González, Máximo Sozzo, Richard Sparks

Leonidas Cheliotis’ lecture was followed by a panel session on “Great Reecession, Resistance and Punishment”. In the framework of this panel, Ignacio González (Complutense University of Madrid, Spain) presented a paper on “Penalizing the Protest: Neoliberalism and the management of resistances”. Discussing on the same topic, Manuel Maroto (University of Castilla La Mancha, Spain) gave a presentation on “Criminal justice and the repression of political dissent: Some current trends in Spain”.

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From left to right, Patricia Faraldo, Máximo Sozzo

The last lecture of the Conference was given on 4 October by Máximo Sozzo (National University of the Litoral, Argentina), reflecting on “Beyond the punitive turn? Postneoliberalism and punishment in Argentina”.

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From left to right, Máximo Sozzo, Anabella Museri, Alejandra Otamendi

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From left to right, Luz María Puente, Alejandra Otamendi

In order to also examine the contours of penality in Latin America, Máximo Sozzo’s lecture was followed by a panel session which gathered two presentations given by Argentinian researchers. On the one hand, Anabella Museri (CELS, Argentina) presented a paper written by her and Paula Litvarchky entitled “Breaks and continuities in Criminal Justice: The reform of the flagrancia concept in Buenos Aires province”. On the other hand, Alejandra Otamendi (University of Buenos Aires, Argentina) gave a presentation on “Public support of punitive policies at the Metropolitan Area of Buenos Aires (2000-2010)”.

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From left to right, José Ángel Brandariz, Miguel Abel

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From left to right, José Ángel Brandariz, Santiago Ruiz, Miguel Abel

The last panel session of the Conference hosted two fairly different presentations, gathered under the title “Neoliberal Penality Issues”. First, Miguel Abel (University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain) presented a paper on “Beyond Neoliberalism? Politics and punishment in money laundering” (Paper). Thereafter, Santiago Ruiz (Complutense University of Madrid, Spain) gave a presentation on “The citizen (in)security in the neoliberal era: The case of Lavapiés”.