Congreso/Conference

Workshop ‘Women, Crime and Justice in a Changing Europe’

Sunday, April 30th, 2017

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[ENG] On April, 24-25, the Law School of the University of A Coruña hosted the workshop ‘Women, Crime and Justice in a Changing Europe‘. This academic meeting was sponsored by the working group on Gender, Crime and Justice of the European Society of Criminology, and co-organised by the ECRIM, together with the co-chairs of the ESC working group, Loraine Gelsthorpe (University of Cambridge, England) and  Michele Burman (University of Glasgow, Scotland).

The 2-day workshop gathered around 30 scholars, who debated on a wide variety of Gender and Justice topics, such as violence against women, the experience of imprisoned women, trafficking in human beings, sex work and prostitution and reproductive rights. Additionally, a general meeting of the working group was held during the workshop.

 

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From left to right: Elaine Player, Elaine Genders

On Monday, April 24, the workshop wa opened with a session called ‘Women in Prison‘. In this panel, Elaine Genders (University College London, England) and Elaine Player (Kings College London, England) presented a paper on ‘Post Brexit: Implications for the safe delivery of psychologically intrusive rehabilitative interventions in women’s prisons‘.

 

IMG_0080Anabel Cerezo

The topic  was subsequently addressed by Anabel Cerezo (University of Málaga, Spain), who
reflected on ‘Women Prisoners and Health: The Implementation
of Bangkok Rules to the Spanish Prison Legislation‘.

 

IMG_0084Ana Ballesteros

Ana Ballesteros (University of Barcelona, Spain) also focused on the situation of female inmates in Spain, by presenting a paper on ‘Responsibilisation and female imprisonment in
contemporary penal policy: “Respect Modules”
(“Módulos de Respeto”) in Spain‘.

 

IMG_0095Rachel Goodhill

The second papel session was entitled ‘In Search of Social Justice’. It began with a presentation made by Rachel Goldhill (University of Portsmouth, England), and called ‘Two steps forward, 3 steps back. A study of
community provision for women service users in England and Wales‘.

 

IMG_0100Anne-Marie Slotboom

Anne-Marie Slotboom (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands) eventually debated the process of desistance from crime from the perspective of female offenders.

 

IMG_0101Fátima Pérez

Finally, this panel session included a presentation made by Fátima Pérez (University of Málaga, Spain), who evaluated the penal policies implemented in Spain to prevent violence against women.

IMG_0106Lorea Arenas

Lorea Arenas (University of Málaga, Spain) opened the third panel session, which was focused on domestic abuse. The Spanish scholar presented a paper on ‘GPS and domestic violence in Spain‘.

 

IMG_0116Emma Forbes

This presentation was followed by the talk given by Emma Forbes (University of Glasgow, Scotland), who debated the impact of Devolution, Brexit, and the post-Brexit political context in the penal policies against domestic abuse
in Scotland.

 

IMG_0119General meeting of the ESC working group on Gender, Crime and Justice

IMG_0127General meeting of the ESC working group on Gender, Crime and Justice

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General meeting of the ESC working group on Gender, Crime and Justice

A general meeting of the ESC working group on Gender, Crime and Justice was also held on Monday, April 24. In this meeting the participants organised several panels to be sponsored by the working group in the upcoming Cardiff conference of the ESC, as well as began to prepare both an special issue of an academic journal and a collective book on gender and justice issues.

 

IMG_0136From left to right: Michele Burman, Loraine Gelsthorpe

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From left to right: Patricia Faraldo, Michele Burman, Loraine Gelsthorpe

The general meeting of the working group was followed by a master class given the organisers of the workshop, Loraine Gelsthorpe (University of Cambridge, England), Michele Burman (University of Glasgow, Scotland), and Patricia Faraldo (University of A Coruna, Spain). The senior scholars provided an audience of PhD students and early-career reseachers a number of most helpful hints on how to write a PhD Dissertation and how to publish in international journals.

 

IMG_0148Sílvia Gomes

The second day of the  workshop was opened by a session entitled ‘Analysing gender‘. Sílvia Gomes (University of Minho, Portugal), presented a paper entitled ‘When gender violence is in the news: theoretical reflections and practical dilemmas‘.

 

IMG_0162Silvia Rodríguez

Within this panel session, the ECRIM member Silvia Rodríguez (University of A Coruna, Spain) gave a talk on ‘A Gender-Based Analysis of Human Trafficking Cases in Spain‘.

 

IMG_0169Ana Guerreiro

Finally, this session included as well a paper presented by Ana Guerreiro (ISMAI, Portugal), who examined the participation of women and the role played by female offenders in criminal organisations.

 

IMG_0178Martina Althoff

The second panel session of this day was comprised by two presentations. First, Martina Althoff (University of Groningen, The Netherlands) presented a paper on ‘What about women’s self-determination and prostitution policy? An assessment of the Dutch and Swedish legislation and its effects‘.

 

IMG_0186Monika Platek

Second, Monika Platek (University of Warsaw, Poland) gave a talk entitled ‘When reproductive rights become a crime. Not only case of Poland‘.

 

IMG_0192From left to right: Oona Brooks, Luz María Puente

The last session of the workshop was called ‘Responding to Violence
Against Women‘ and included three presentations. On the one hand, Oona Brooks (University of Glasgow, Scotland) presented a paper on ‘Contemporary developments in rape advocacy: a view from victims/survivors‘.

 

IMG_0198From left to right: Janine Janssen, Luz María Puente, Sheila Fernández and Oona Brooks

IMG_0196From left to right: Janine Janssen, Luz María Puente

On the other hand, Sheila Fernández (Autonomous University of Chile, Chile / University of A
Coruna, Spain) debated its paper called ‘Indigenous women and violence against women.
Proposals from Latin America‘. Finally, the workshop was closed by the presentation made by Janine Janssen (Avans University, The Netherlands), who explored honour-based violence from the perspective of virtual and social media.

 

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ESC Working Group on Gender and Justice. A Coruña Workshop. Information

Thursday, February 16th, 2017

[ENG] Dear members of the ESC Working Group on Gender and Justice

‘Women, Crime and Justice in a Changing Europe’ 24th and 25th April 2017

 Whilst we realise that this is fairly short notice, we are very pleased to announce that there will be a meeting and mini-conference for the ESC Working Group on Gender and Justice to be held on 24th and 25th April 2017  at the Universidad A Coruña in Galicia, Spain.

The theme of the mini-conference  is ‘Gender, Crime and Justice in a Changing Europe’ and we invite titles and abstracts for short papers which address this  core theme.

 Whilst the  European Union has long championed gender equality, and has been at the forefront of initiatives in relation to  violence against women, there has nonetheless been a noticeable gap in relation to debates and policies concerning women,  crime and justice.  Within a context of  economic crisis and fragility, Europe faces major challenges and is undergoing monumental change.  Many countries in Europe are seeing massive cuts in pubic services, reductions in health and social care, rising food and transport costs and increased rates of unemployment. Patterns of forced migration and flows of people through and across Europe pose great challenges. Some countries face huge  debts and are imposing wide ranging cuts on  public spending and health and welfare services. Poverty and social exclusion are  increasing. Support services are diminishing. These  conditions, taken together, pose  immense  challenges to  political systems. But they also  create the social and economic conditions which give rise to crime and the disproportionate criminalisation of certain groups.  At the same time,  many countries are witnessing rising rates of female imprisonment and reduced access to alternative forms of punishment.  What are the implications of a changing Europe for achieving justice for women ?   We therefore welcome papers on any aspect of women,  crime  and justice in a changing Europe.

 As well as allowing for an opportunity to meet outside the confines of the ESC annual conference, this  mini-conference will  provide a forum for encouraging encourage debate and analysis on the important topic of women  and justice in Europe, but will also  allow us an opportunity to hear about each others’ work, plan  future Working Group activities and general networking. The event will take place at the Universidad A Coruña, and will be hosted by Professor Patricia Faraldo Cabana and her colleagues in the Law School. The  conference accommodation will be in the delightful  city of A Coruña in the northwest of Spain. 

 Thanks to the generosity of the universities of A Coruña  and of Cambridge, there are no costs to attend the event and there are  funds available to cover accommodation costs in A Coruña for two nights for up to 30 people.  However, there are no funds to cover the  travel costs of delegates, although a limited number of travel bursaries will be available to assist PhD  researchers  to attend.

 If you would plan  to attend this event please can you register interest  to michele.burman@glasgow.ac.uk by 1st March 2017  clearly marking your email  ‘ESC WG Gender and Justice A Coruña’  so we can make the accommodation bookings and plan for a set number of attendees.. If you plan to  present a paper then please  can you send in the title and abstract  to the same address no later than  12th  March 2017. Details of the programme will be circulated to attendees no later than March 31st 2017.

 If you are a PhD student or a postdoctoral student and  have no other recourse to funds to allow you to attend, and  wish to apply for a travel bursary then please submit a short application,  providing the details below, along with a short reference letter from a supervisor. Preference will normally be given to those wishing to travel outside their country of residence: 

 Name:

University:

Current role (PhD/PostDoc):

Anticipated costs of travel:  

Principal reason for wishing to attend: 

Title of  paper you plan to present:

International Conference: ‘Crises, Economy and Punishment: The Influence of the Great Recession on Crime and Penality’

Tuesday, September 20th, 2016

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General overview of the participants of the Conference

 

 

[ENG] On September 15-16, the Law School of the University of A Coruna hosted the International Conference ‘Crises, Economy and Punishment: The Influence of the Great Recession on Crime and Penality‘. The Conference was organised by the ECRIM research group, in collaboration with Máximo Sozzo (National University of the Litoral, Argentina) and Russell Hogg (Queensland University of Technology, Australia) and it gathered around 45 scholars from a wide variety of American, Australasian, and European countries.

The Conference began with a plenary session in which Dario Melossi (University of Bologna, Italy) reflected on “The Prison and the Factory Revisited: Penality and the Critique of Political Economy”.

Two parallel sessions ensued this lecture. Parallel session no. 1 (“Crime and Penality 1”) included the presentations: “Crime and punishment in Brazil: Is restorative justice a suitable alternative to prison in the context of the (late) economic crisis?” (Daniel Achutti and Raffaella Pallamolla, UniLasalle, Brazil); “While the crisis had not yet arrived: mass incarceration in times of social inclusion in the Brazilian democracy” (David S. Fonseca, Queensland University of Technology, Australia), and  “Economic crisis, politics, and punishment: impacts and influences in the Brazilian case” (Bruno Rotta-Almeida, Federal University of Pelotas, Brazil). Parallel session no. 2 (“Political violence, torture and penal policies”) was formed by the talks: “The releasement of Arnaldo Otegi as a vanishing point for the analysis of the past and present exceptionalism trends in terrorism crime policies in Spain” (David Castro-Liñares, University of A Coruna, Spain); “Contours, resistances and limits of the so-called ‘Global War on Terrorism’: The (controversial) persistence of the enemy within the European Union” (Borxa Colmenero-Ferreiro, David Soto-Díaz and David Castro-Liñares, University of A Coruna, Spain), and  “To say the impossible, to imagine the unimaginable: the punitive experience of torture” (Ignacio Mendiola, University of Basque Country, Spain).

The morning session ended with the talk given by Máximo Sozzo (National University of the Litoral), who lectured on “Punishment and economic and social crises. Puzzling relations?”.

Parallel session no. 3 and 4 were carried out in the afternoon of September 15. Parallel session no. 3 (“Crises and Penality II”) integrated the presentations: “Six Years On: Reflections on the decline in the Spanish prison population and the post-crisis criminal justice system” (José A. Brandariz-García, University of A Coruna, Spain); “A different approach to understand the imprisonment rate decrease in the Netherlands” (David Soto-Díaz and Silvia Rodríguez-López, University of A Coruna, Spain); “Economic crisis and reduction of the prison population: the Italian case” (Giovanni Torrente, University of Turin, Italy), and “Studying the penal system in times of crises: conceptual, empirical and political challenges” (Ignacio González-Sánchez, University of Girona, Spain). Parallel session no. 4 (“Policies of migration control”) comprised the papers: “Who has been deported from Spain during the economic crisis? Some answers from a feminist and post-colonial perspective” (Cristina Fernández-Bessa, University of Barcelona, Spain); “Detention Centers for Foreigners: Punishing Undocumented Migrants by the Deprivation of Liberty in the Schengen Area” (Nerea Galdós-Pozo, University of A Coruna, Spain); “The deportation of foreigners in the Chilean criminal justice system: A technique of ‘actuarial justice’?” (Roberto A. Dufraix-Tapia, Arturo Prat University, Chile), and “Detaining migrants in times of crisis in Italy: Undeportability, discipline, and the differential inclusion” (Giulia Fabini, University of Bologna, Italy).

These parallel session were followed by a lecture given by Russell Hogg (Queensland University of Technology, Australia), who talked about “The Financialization of Society and the Monetization of Justice: Crime, Punishment and the Global Financial Crisis”.

Finally, the first day of the Conference came to an end with a panel session devoted to “Penological Issues: Community, Control and Penality, that included the presentations: “Neo-liberalism and changes in the role of European alternatives to imprisonment” (Daniela Ronco and Michele Miravalle, University of Turin, Italy); “What reentry? Prisoners’ expectations and perceptions about life inside and outside prison” (Sílvia Gomes, University of Minho, Portugal); “Social exclusion, digital technology and ‘smartpowers’” (Javier Cigüela,  Abat Oliba University-CEU, Spain), and  “State Violence and Economic Crises in Men and Women’s Prison: Discourses in the Portuguese Press” (Luísa Saavedra, Eunice Seixas, Miguel Cameira and Ana Margarida Silva, University of Minho, Portugal).

The second day of the Conference began with a plenary session, in which Patricia Faraldo-Cabana (University of A Coruna, Spain) lectured on “Do economic crises influence the use of fines? Revisiting Rusche and Kirchheimer’s Punishment and Social Structure”, and Marcelo F. Aebi (University of Lausanne, Switzerland) presented a paper on  “Why the financial crisis led to a decrease of prison populations in Europe?”.

The Conference continued with two parallel sessions. Parallel session no. 7 (“Neo-liberalism, Political Economy and Penality I”) included the presentations: “Itinerary of the issue of security since neoliberalism return in Argentina” (Gabriela Seghezzo and  Nicolás Dallorso, University of Buenos Aires-CONICET, Argentina); “Crisis and Economics of Crime and punishment in Argentina” (Diego Zysman-Quirós, University of Buenos Aires, Argentina); “The reorganization of ‘repression’ during the Great Recession: the Antiterrorism Act and the Anti-picketing Protocol in today’s Argentina” (Juan Cruz Goñi, National University of Lanús, Argentina), and “Media and political discourse on juvenile crime in Brazil: culture, economy and punishment” (Marília de Nardin Budó, Faculdade Meridional, Brazil, and Riccardo Cappi, State University of Bahia/State University of Feira de Santana, Brazil). Parallel session no. 8 (“Neo-liberalism, Political Economy and Penality II”) comprised the papers: “The limits of political economy in understanding criminalization” (António P. Dores, ISCTE-IUL, Portugal); “From project exile to mass delivery of pain: How many of us are being abandoned?” (Daniel Jiménez-Franco, University of Zaragoza, Spain), and “Institutional anomie and the Portuguese system of justice” (José N. Cruz, University of Porto, Portugal).

The second morning of the Conference finished with two additional parallel sessions. Parallel session no. 9 (“Managerialism, Crime Prevention and Penality”) integrated the presentations: “Towards an ‘Austere Prevention’? Impact of Austerity Policies on Crime Risk Management in the Field of Gender Violence in Spain” (David San Martín-Segura, University of La Rioja, Spain), and “Banal prevention of insecurity as a way of governance: A perspective from Madrid” (Sergio García-García and Débora Ávila-Cantos, Complutense University of Madrid, Spain). Parallel session no. 10 (“Political Economy and Penality: Reflections on organised crime”) was formed by four presentations: “The Yakuza and the reasons of its longevity” (Martina Baradel, University of London, United Kingdom); “Economic crisis and Organized Crime in Italy” (Antonella Pasculli, University of Bari, Italy); “The Business of Human Trafficking in Times of Economic Crisis: Implications for the Criminal Liability of Legal Persons” (Silvia Rodríguez-López, University of A Coruna, Spain), and “The North-South shipment of toxic waste as a new phenomenon of criminality of the powerful” (María A. Fuentes-Loureiro, University of A Coruna, Spain).

After the lunch break, the last parallel session of the Conference were carried out. Parallel session no. 11 (“Penality Issues”) was integrated by the presentations: “Explaining the differences in the application of detention for juvenile offenders in Spain” (Beatriz Cruz-Márquez, University of Cádiz, Spain); “Crisis and Neoliberal Hegemony in the European Union: Consequences in Criminal Law” (Jorge Correcher-Mira, University of València, Spain), and “Americanization of the penalty, populist punitiveness and security: recent proposals in the justification of the punishment” (Elena Górriz-Royo, University of Valencia, Spain). Parallel session no. 12 (“Corporate crime, corruption and penality”) was comprised by the papers: “Advantages and risks of self-regulation policies and corporate internal investigations” (Ana M. Neira-Pena, University of A Coruna, Spain); “Anticorruption discourses and neoliberalism” (Manuel Maroto-Calatayud, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Spain), and “Consequences of the prosecution of Icelandic bankers following the bank collapse in 2008” (Sigur?ur Tómas Magnússon, University of Reykjavik, Iceland).

A final plenary session closed the Conference. This last panel encompassed the lectures: “Beyond the Punitive Turn: The Sources of Transformation in the Post-Rehabilitative Prison: European and American Perspectives. Part I: Europe” (Elena Larrauri-Pijoan, Pompeu Fabra University, Spain), and “Beyond the Punitive Turn: The Sources of Transformation in the Post-Rehabilitative Prison: European and American Perspectives. Part II: US” (Jonathan Simon, University of California-Berkeley, United States).

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From left to right: Máximo Sozzo, Russell Hogg, Carmen Garcimartín, Patricia Faraldo, José Ángel Brandariz

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From left to right: Máximo Sozzo, Dario Melossi

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From left to right: David Castro, Borxa Colmenero, Daniel Jiménez

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Ignacio Mendiola

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From left to right: Ignacio González, Daniel Achutti, David Fonseca, Bruno Almeida, Luísa Saavedra

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Bruno Almeida

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From left to right: Russell Hogg, Raffaella Pallamolla, Diego Zysman

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From left to right: Diego Zysman, Ignacio González, Daniel Achutti

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Máximo Sozzo

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From left to right: Silvia Rodríguez, David Castro, Russell Hogg

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General overview of Ignacio González’s presentation

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From left to right: Giulia Fabini, Marián Fuentes, Roberto Dufraix, Cristina Fernández, Nerea Galdos

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From left to right: Luz María Puente, Russell Hogg

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From left to right: Silvia Rodríguez, Daniela Ronco, Michele Miravalle

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From left to right: Silvia Rodríguez, Luísa Saavedra

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From left to right: Javier Cigüela, Luísa Saavedre, Sílvia Gomes, Daniela Ronco, Michele Miravalle

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From left to right: Marcelo Aebi, Patricia Faraldo, Kerry Carrington

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From left to right: Marcelo Aebi, Patricia Faraldo, Kerry Carrington

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From left to right: António Dores, Cristina Fernández

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Daniel Jiménez

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José Cruz

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From left to right: Débora Ávila, Ignacio González, Juan Goñi, Marília Budó, Gabriela Seghezzo, Diego Zysman

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From left to right: Débora Ávila, David San Martín, Daniel Jiménez

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From left to right: Marián Fuentes, Antonella Pasculli, Martina Baradel, Silvia Rodríguez

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Ana Neira

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Manuel Maroto

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Sigurdur Magnússon

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From left to right: Jorge Correcher, Silvia Rodríguez, Elena Górriz

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From left to right: Elena Larrauri, José Ángel Brandariz

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Jonathan Simon

Upcoming Conference: ‘Crises, Economy and Punishment: The Influence of the Great Recession on Crime and Penality’

Tuesday, July 12th, 2016

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[ENG] On 15-16 September, the Law School of the University of A Coruna will host the International Conference ‘Crises, Economy and Punishment: The Influence of the Great Recession on Crime and Penality‘, organised by the ECRIM together with Professor Russell Hogg (Queensland University of Technology, Australia) and Professor Máximo Sozzo (National University of the Litoral, Argentina). The Conference will encompass some 50 lectures and presentations of scholars coming from a dozen countries, that will reflect on the influence of the economic crisis on crime and penality.

Please see below the final programme of the Conference:

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“Los desafíos de la Justicia en la era post-crisis”. II Processulus: Encuentro de jóvenes investigadores en Derecho procesal

Friday, July 24th, 2015

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[CAST] Los días 26-27 de noviembre de 2015 se celebrará en la Facultad de Derecho de A Coruña el II Processulus: Encuentro de jóvenes investigadores en Derecho procesal, que en esta ocasión lleva por título “Los desafíos de la Justicia en la era post-crisis“. El Encuentro cuenta con la dirección académica de Ana María Neira Pena, investigadora del ECRIM.

 

CARTA DE PRESENTACIÓN

Estimado/a compañero/a:

Nos complace presentarte la segunda edición de Processulus: encuentro de jóvenes investigadores en Derecho Procesal. Dicho evento científico se celebrará los días 26 y 27 de noviembre en la Facultad de Derecho de la Universidade da Coruña.

Tras la exitosa acogida de la primera edición de Processulus, celebrada en noviembre de 2014 en la Facultad de Derecho de la Universidad de Salamanca, contando con más de 30 participantes y con varios profesores universitarios de gran altura científica, en calidad de padrinos; nos animamos a continuar con esta aventura destinada a que jóvenes investigadores en Derecho Procesal puedan impulsar o consolidar su carrera investigadora. Al mismo tiempo Processulus es una actividad dirigida a promover el “encuentro” entre distintos académicos y poder así crear sinergias y redes entre los asistentes.

Los excelentes resultados de la primera edición nos han animado a ampliar a dos días la celebración del encuentro en la Facultad de Derecho de la Universidade da Coruña, con el fin de ampliar el número de mesas y ponencias previstas. En esta ocasión, la dirección académica corresponderá a Ana Neira Pena (Personal Investigador en Formación en la Universidade da Coruña), como secretario académico, Julio Pérez Gaipo (Profesor Ayudante en la Universidad de Cantabria), y coordinador del Comité Organizador, Federico Bueno de Mata (Profesor Ayudante Doctor de la Universidad de Salamanca). Esta actividad se encuadra en el Proyecto de Investigación “El sistema penal español en el periodo postcrisis” (DER 2014-52674-R).

El encuentro se ocupará de los retos del Derecho Procesal en la actual etapa post-crisis, caracterizada, entre otras cosas, por las políticas de austeridad en lo económico y por la desconfianza frente a las instituciones públicas y frente a los reguladores. Para ello se estructurarán bajo esta premisa diferentes mesas sobre las siguientes materias: Derecho Procesal penal, civil y mercantil, laboral y contencioso, orgánico, y ADR. Cada una de ellas estará encabezada por un especialista de reconocida competencia en la materia para después ser completada con las aportaciones de varios jóvenes procesalistas, que tomarán la palabra para defender sus comunicaciones y exponer sus conclusiones, impresiones e inquietudes sobre los temas tratados. Igualmente se reservará tiempo para el debate y la reflexión.

Por todo ello, te invitamos a participar en este II Processulus mandando tu propuesta de comunicación o abstract a la dirección processulus@gmail.com antes del 26 de octubre de 2015. Para más información puedes consultar la web www.ecrim.es/processulus . Te esperamos en A Coruña los próximos 26 y 27 de noviembre.

Comité Organizador II Processulus
Ana María Neira Pena. Directora Académica.
Julio Pérez Gaipo. Secretario Académico.
Federico Bueno de Mata. Coordinador Comité Organizador.

 

CALL FOR PAPERS
1.- El encuentro se dirige, principalmente, a estudiantes de doctorado, de post-doctorado, así como a otros jóvenes académicos y profesionales del Derecho. Para poder participar como comunicante es preciso estar previamente matriculado en el evento. Podrán presentarse trabajos en grupo, siempre que todos los miembros del grupo se encuentren matriculados.

2.- Las comunicaciones tendrán por objeto cualquier tema de actualidad procesal y se adscribirán a una de las cuatro mesas siguientes: a) Los retos y las reformas de la justicia penal; b) La justicia civil y mercantil en la sociedad post-crisis; c) Los desafíos de la justicia laboral y la justicia contencioso-administrativa; d) Las reformas orgánicas y la Administración de justicia en la sociedad post-crisis; e) Los medios alternativos de resolución de conflictos en la sociedad post-crisis
3. Los interesados en participar deberán enviar, antes del 26 de octubre a la siguiente dirección processulus@gmail.com, un resumen de entre 3000 y 5000 palabras en el que se especifique el tema de la comunicación y la estructura de la misma, así como la hipótesis de trabajo y una conclusión provisional del mismo.
4.- Los miembros del comité organizador recopilarán las comunicaciones y las numerarán por orden de recepción, de tal forma que no podrá identificarse su autoría. Cada comunicación será valorada por un miembro del comité científico que, sin conocer la autoría de la misma, valorará su aptitud para ser defendida públicamente en el encuentro, calificándola como apta o no apta.
5.- Posteriormente, se celebrará una reunión en la que el comité científico escogerá, de entre aquellos trabajos que hayan obtenido la calificación de apto, los de mayor interés, atendiendo a la actualidad del tema, a la originalidad del enfoque y claridad expositiva del autor, sí como al valor científico del trabajo propuesto y a su adecuación a los ejes temáticos del evento. El 30 de octubre se comunicarán los seleccionados para la defensa pública.
6.- Aquellos que resulten seleccionados para su defensa pública deberán enviar la versión definitiva de defensa pública antes del 20 de noviembre. Esta versión escrita será opcionalmente mejorada para ser publicada posteriormente en forma de libro con pautas concretas que se remitirán en los meses siguientes a la celebración del evento.
7. Las comunicaciones tendrán una extensión mínima de 10 folios y máxima de 15 (interlineado sencillo y fuente Times New Roman, 12 puntos; notas a pie de página interlineado sencillo y fuente Times New Roman, 10 puntos), podrán estar redactadas en castellano, en inglés o en portugués, de acuerdo con el carácter internacional del evento y deberán enviarse por correo electrónico a la siguiente dirección: processulus@gmail.com

“La sombra del delincuente sexual en la reforma penal de 2015”: Congreso en la Facultad de Derecho de A Coruña

Monday, June 1st, 2015

[CAST]  Los días 27-28 de mayo tuvo lugar en la Facultad de Derecho de A Coruña el Congreso “La sombra del delincuente sexual en la reforma penal de 2015”, organizado por los profesores miembros del ECRIM José Antonio Ramos Vázquez y Eva Souto García, que reunió a un importante número de penalistas españoles en la reflexión sobre la reforma penal de 2015, y más en particular sobre las modificaciones en materia de delitos sexuales.

1

De izqda. a dcha.: Miguel Ángel Cadenas, José Manuel Busto, Fernando Suanzes

El Congreso comenzó el 27 de mayo con la inauguración oficial a cargo de D. José Manuel Busto Lago, Decano de la Facultad de Derecho de A Coruña, Fernando Suanzes Pérez, Fiscal Superior de Galicia y Miguel Ángel Cadenas Sobreira, Presidente del Tribunal Superior de Justicia de Galicia.

2

De izqda. a dcha.: Tomás Vives, Carlos Martínez-Buján

A continuación se iniciaron los trabajos del Congreso, con una conferencia impartida por el Dr. Tomás Salvador Vives Antón, catedrático emérito de Derecho penal de la Universidad de Valencia.

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De izqda. a dcha.: Mercedes García Arán, Juan Carlos Carbonell, Carlos Martínez-Buján, Juan Terradillos

La ponencia fue seguida por una mesa redonda sobre “Política criminal y reforma penal de 2015”, en la que intervinieron los catedráticos Juan Terradillos Basoco (Universidad de Cádiz), Juan Carlos Carbonell Mateu (Universidad de Valencia) y Mercedes García Arán (Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona)

6

De izqda. a dcha.: José Antonio Ramos, María Peral, José Luis González Cussac, Luiz Peres-Neto

El Congreso se reanudó en la tarde del 27 de mayo con una mesa redonda sobre “El papel de los medios de comunicación”, en la que tomaron la palabra los profesores José Luis González Cussac (Universidad de Valencia) y Luiz Peres-Neto (ESPM, Sao Paulo, Brasil) y la periodista del Diario El Mundo María Peral Parrado.

4

De izqda. a dcha.: Lucía Martínez Garay, Manuel Cancio, Luz María Puente, Víctor Gómez Martín

La tercera mesa del día se dedicó al análisis de “La peligrosidad como paradigma”, sobre lo que reflexionaron los profesores Manuel Cancio Meliá (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid), Lucía Martínez Garay (Universidad de Valencia) y Víctor Gómez Martín (Universidad de Barcelona).

5

De izqda. a dcha.: José Antonio Ramos, Gonzalo Quintero

La segunda jornada del Congreso (día 28 de mayo) se inició con una conferencia a cargo del Dr. Gonzalo Quintero Olivares, catedrático de Derecho penal de la Universidad Rovira i Virgili de Tarragona.

3

De izqda. a dcha.: José Antonio Ramos, Miguel Díaz y García, Agustín Malón

La ponencia fue seguida de una mesa redonda sobre “La reforma de los delitos sexuales: Entre la moral y el derecho”, en la que intervinieron los profesores Miguel Díaz y García Conlledo (Universidad de León) y Agustín Malón Marco (Universidad de Zaragoza).

7

De izqda. a dcha.: María José Rodríguez Mesa, Carlos Suárez-Mira, Eva Souto, Fernando Miró, David Morillas

La última mesa del día 28, que sirvió como clausura del Congreso, se tituló “La reforma de los delitos sexuales: Un paso atrás”, y en ella intervinieron el magistrado-juez Carlos Suárez-Mira Rodríguez, y los profesores María José Rodríguez Mesa (Universidad de Cádiz), David Morillas Fernández (Universidad de Murcia) y Fernando Miró Llinares (Universidad Miguel Hernández de Elche).

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Congreso “Corrupción y fraudes a consumidores: Perspectivas y casos actuales”

Saturday, May 9th, 2015

cartel corrupcion final

[CAST] Los próximos días 1-2 de junio de 2015 la Facultad de Derecho de la Universidad de A Coruña y el Colegio de Abogados de A Coruña acogerán el Congreso “Corrupción y fraude de consumidores: Perspectivas y casos actuales“, organizado por la Dra. Luz María Puente Aba, miembro del ECRIM, y que contará con la presencia de un importante número de significados especialistas, españoles e internacionales.

Programa del Congreso:

Lunes 1 junio 2015
10.00 h. Apertura del seminario.
10.15 h. 1ª Sesión (Salón de Grados de la Facultad de Derecho).
Administración desleal de patrimonios y corrupcio?n pública:
perspectiva europea y nuevas tendencias legislativas
· Prof. Dr. Carlos Martínez-Buján Pérez (Universidad de A Coruña)
· Prof. Dr. Fernando Vázquez-Portomeñe Seijas (Universidad de Santiago de Compostela)
· Prof. Dr. Manuel Gómez Tomillo (Universidad de Valladolid)
· Prof. Dr. Francesco Viganò (Universidad de Milán)
16.30 h. 2ª Sesión (Salón de Actos del Colegio de Abogados).
Tutela de consumidores / inversores: herramientas actuales del
derecho penal ante los fraudes patrimoniales
· Profa. Dra. Patricia Faraldo Cabana (Universidad de A Coruña)
· Julio Lois Boedo (Abogado)
· Prof. Dr. José Ignacio Gallego Soler (Universidad de Barcelona. Abogado)

Martes 2 junio 2015
3ª Sesión (Salón de Grados de la Facultad de Derecho)

El nuevo delito de financiación ilegal de los partidos políticos. Casos actuales en materia de corrupción y de fraudes a consumidores/inversores

Prof. Dr. Manuel Maroto Calatayud (Universidad de Castilla – La Mancha)

Mesa redonda: “Casos actuales en materia de corrupción y fraudes a consumidores/inversores”:
· Profa. Dra. Luz María Puente Aba (Universidad de A Coruña)
· Profa. Dra. Eva María Souto García (Universidad de A Coruña)
· David Castro Liñares (Universidad de A Coruña)
· Profa. Dra. Patricia Tapia Ballesteros (Universidad de Valladolid)
· Prof. Dr. Luis Rodríguez Moro (Universidad de Cádiz)
· Dr. Alejandro de Pablo Serrano (Universidad de Valladolid)
· Dra. Teresa Manso Porto (Instituto Max Planck de Derecho penal extranjero
e internacional, Freiburg i.Br. (Alemania)
· Profa. Dra. Natalia Pérez Rivas (Universidad de Santiago de Compostela)

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Congreso “La sombra del delincuente sexual en la reforma penal de 2015”

Wednesday, April 15th, 2015

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[CAST] Los próximos días 27-28 de mayo de 2015 la Facultad de Derecho de la Universidad de A Coruña acogerá el Congreso “La sombra del delincuente sexual en la reforma penal de 2015“, organizado por los Dres. José Antonio Ramos y Eva María Souto, miembros del ECRIM, y que contará con la presencia de un importante número de significados especialistas.

El programa del Congreso es el siguiente:

DÍA 27:

9:30h: Inauguración por parte de las autoridades políticas y académicas

10:00h: Conferencia:

Prof. Dr. Tomás Vives Antón (Universidad de Valencia)

11:00h: Pausa

11:30h: Mesa I: “Política criminal y reforma penal de 2015

Profs. Drs. Juan Terradillos Basoco (Universidad de Cádiz), Juan Carlos Carbonell Mateu (Universidad de Valencia) y Mercedes García Arán (Universidad Autónoma de Barcelona)

(Almuerzo)

16:15h: Mesa II: “El papel de los medios de comunicación

Profs. Drs. José Luis González Cussac (Universidad de Valencia) y Luiz Peres (Universidad ESPM, Brasil), Dña. María Peral Parrado (Diario El Mundo)

18:00: Pausa

18:30h: Mesa III: “La peligrosidad como paradigma

Profs. Drs. Manuel Cancio Meliá (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid), Lucía Martínez Garay (Universidad de Valencia) y Víctor Gómez Martín (Universidad de Barcelona)

20:15h: Clausura de la primera jornada

DÍA 28:

10:00h: Conferencia:

Prof. Dr. Gonzalo Quintero Olivares (Universidad Rovira i Virgili)

11:00h: Pausa

11:30h: Mesa IV: “La reforma de los delitos sexuales: entre la moral y el Derecho

Profs. Miguel Díaz y García Conlledo (Universidad de León), Agustín Malón Marco (Universidad de Zaragoza) y María Luisa Cuerda Arnau (Universidad Jaume I)

(Almuerzo)

16:30h: Mesa V: “La reforma de los delitos sexuales: un paso atrás

Profs. Drs. María José Rodríguez Mesa (Universidad de Cádiz), Carlos Suárez-Mira Rodríguez (Magistrado-Juez), David Morillas Fernández (Universidad de Murcia) y Fernando Miró Llinares (Universidad Miguel Hernández)

19:00h: Clausura
Seminario organizado en el marco del proyecto de investigación
Imaxe social, regulación xurídica e estratexias de protección nos delitos sexuais con vítima menor de idade” (EM2012/70), concedido por la Secretaría Xeral de Universidades de la Xunta de Galicia

Información y contacto:
Prof. Dr. José Antonio Ramos Vázquez (jramosv@udc.es)
Prof. Dra. Eva María Souto García (esoutog@udc.es)

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Economy and Criminal Law in Europe: Milano International Conference

Wednesday, January 28th, 2015

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From left to right: Nicola Selvaggi, Carlo Enrico Paliero, Gabrio Forti, Patricia Faraldo, Norberto de la Mata

[ENG] On 29-30 May 2014 the University of Milano (Italy) hosted a Spanish-Italian Conference on Business Criminal Law, entitled ‘Economy and Criminal Law in Europe: A Comparison between Italian and Spanish legal practices’. The International Conference was jointly organised by Dr. Luz María Puente Aba (ECRIM, University of A Coruna) and Dr. Francesco Viganó (University of Milano, Italy). The Conference encompassed three panel sessions, focusing on key issues of Business Criminal Law: corruption, corporate and stock market criminal law, and the criminal liability of corporations. The panel sessions were integrated by Spanish and Italian lecturers, who examined both the legal and judicial trends which characterise the current situation of some critical domains of Business Criminal Law, and the increasing subjection of national jurisdictions to International legal rules in this realm. The Conferece sought to highlight the main problems faced by the criminal justice system as regards the prevention and punishment of those economic crimes, and to analyse ways to overcoming these problems.

The papers presented within the Conference were subsequently published by the Italian on-line journal “Diritto penale contemporaneo” (No. 3-4, 2014).

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Luz María Puente Aba

International Conference ‘The political economy of punishment today: Visions, debates and challenges’

Tuesday, September 23rd, 2014

2014-09-18 10.08.12

General overview

On September 18-19 the Law School of the University of A Coruna hosted and International Conference, entitled ‘The political economy of punishment today: Visions, debates and challenges’. The Conference was organised by the ECRIM, under the academic coordination of José Ángel Brandariz (University of A Coruna, Spain), Dario Melossi (University of Bologna, Italy) and Máximo Sozzo (National University of the Litoral, Argentina).

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Dario Melossi

The Conference began with a lecture given by Dario Melossi (University of Bologna, Italy). His lecture, entitled ‘The Prison and the Factory revisited: The Cycle of the Canaille’, worked as a general introduction to the topics of the Conference.

Dario Melossi’s lecture was ensued by a first panel session, named ‘Political Economy of Punishment Issues I’, which encompassed two presentations.

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Diego Zysman

On the one hand, Diego Zysman (University of Buenos Aires, Argentina) reflected on ‘Political Economy, Democracy, and punitivism in Argentina’.

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Daniel Jiménez

On the other hand, Daniel Jiménez Franco (University of Zaragoza, Spain), to a certain degree mirroring the perspective of his Argentinean counterpart, gave a talk on ‘Political Economy, Democracy, and punitivism in Spain’.

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Alessandro De Giorgi

The panel session was followed by a lecture given by Alessandro de Giorgi (State University of San Jose, USA). The California-based scholar lectured on ‘Beyond Determinism: Towards a Cultural Political Economy of Punishment in Late Capitalism’.

The Conference resumed in the afternoon of September 18 with a panel session on ‘Political Economy of Punishment Issues II’. The panel session began with a talk given by José Ángel Brandariz (University of A Coruna, Spain), who presented a paper named ‘The punishment of migrants and the Political Economy of Punishment’.

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Ignacio González

Thereafter, Ignacio González Sánchez, from the Complutense University of Madrid, Spain, completed the panel session by giving a talk on ‘Neoliberal policies and the expansion of State punishment’.

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Charlotte Vanneste

A lecture given by Charlotte Vanneste (National Institute of Criminalistics and Criminology, and University of Liège, Belgium) ensued the second panel session. The Belgian scholar reflected on ‘From one recession to another: the lessons of a long-term political economy of punishment’.

The first day of the Conference ended with a panel session on ‘Punishment and Political Economy’, which included three presentations.

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Patricia Faraldo

The first paper was presented by Patricia Faraldo (University of A Coruna, Spain), who also was the chair of the organising committee of the Conference. Her paper was entitled ‘Who dares fine a murderer? Fines and the changing meaning of money in criminal law’.

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Mariel Muraro

The second paper of the panel session, sinthetically named ‘Underclass’, was presented by the Brazilian scholar Mariel Muraro (State University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil).

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Kerry Carrington

Finally, the panel session was closed by a talk given by Kerry Carrington (Queensland University of Technology, Australia). The well-known Australian scholar reflected on ‘Youth Justice, Boot Camps and the Return of the Retributive Justice: The peculiar political economy of punishment in an Australian jurisdiction’.

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Leonidas Cheliotis

The second day of the Conference began with a lecture given by Leonidas Cheliotis (London School of Economics, England, UK). The London-based scholar presented a paper on ‘The Limits of Inclusion: Globalisation, Neoliberalism and State Policies of Border Control’.

A first panel session on ‘Penality Issues’ followed Leonidas Cheliotis’ presentation.

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Hilde Tubex

The panel session was opened by a paper presented by Hilde Tubex (University of Western Australia, Australia), who reflected on ‘Analysing levels of punishment in Australia’.

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Gavin Slade

Geographically shifting the viewpoint, Gavin Slade, from the Free University of Berlin, Germany, presented a paper on ‘Punishment in the Post-soviet Region’.

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Ignacio Mendiola

The panel session was closed by a talk given by Ignacio Mendiola (University of the Basque Country, Spain) and entitled ‘The capture of space: From precarity to inhabitability’.

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From left to right: Máximo Sozzo, Eva Souto, Cristina Fernández Bessa, Ana Neira, David Castro, Ignacio González Sánchez, and Gavin Slade

The morning session of September 19 also hosted a lecture given by Máximo Sozzo (National University of the Litoral, Argentina), in which the Argentinean scholar discussed the topics of political economy of punishment by presenting a paper named ‘Economy, politics and punishment: between ‘why’ and ‘how’ questions’.

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Ana Ballesteros

A second panel session on ‘Penality Issues’ ensued. The first paper of the panel was presented by Ana Ballesteros (University of Barcelona, Spain), who reflected on ‘Respectful moduled (módulos de respeto) in the Spanish Penitentiary System from a gender perspective: Research approach and preliminary results’.

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From left to right: Dimitris Koros, Sofia Spyrea, and Nikolaos Koulouris

The second talk of the panel session was given by three scholars of the Democritus University of Thrace, Greece: Nikolaos Koulouris, Dimitris Koros, and Sofia Spyrea. The greek researchers presented a paper on ‘Inequalities in Punishment: Imprisonment, Community Service and Electronic Monitoring in Greece’.

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Ana Neira

The panel session also included a presentation given by a researcher affliated to the University of A Coruna, Spain: Ana Neira, who reflected on ‘The neoliberal criminal policy as a source of impunity for large corporations. The perverse logic of ‘too big to jail’.

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Richard Sparks

The Conference was closed by a final lecture, given by Richard Sparks (University of Edinburgh, Scotland, UK). As a best final talk of the Conference, the UK scholar presented a paper entitled ‘Anti-politics, penal politics and questions of legitimation’.

International Conference: ‘The political economy of punishment today’. Call for Papers

Wednesday, March 26th, 2014

The political economy of punishment today:

Visions, debates and challenges

International two-day conference

18-19 September 2014

Law School, University of A Coruna

A Coruna, Spain

 

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

Over the last decade, several key texts have sought to examine the recent transformations of penality, most prominently among them mass imprisonment, through Political Economy conceptual tools. Hence, this literature, which is fairly heterogeneous both in perspectives and conclusions, contributed to updating the theoretical framework of Political Economy of Punishment, which was crucial to reframing critical thought on punishment in the 1970s and 1980s. Moreover, those recent works have coincided with the unfolding of a theoretical line aimed at explaining the rise of punitiveness of the last decades from the standpoint of the rise of neoliberalism, understood both as a political project and as an economic doxa. By contrast, another prominent body of literature has tended to emphasise the cultural and/or political components of the evolution of penality – and hence its variability – to some extent side-lining the political economic analysis.

Taking account of this theoretical context, it appears to be particularly timely to reflect on the current condition of the analytical field of the Political Economy of Punishment from the plural perspectives that arose from these new contributions on the subject.

First, the Conference aims to debate whether those recent texts are shaping new theoretical tools for the political economic analysis of punishment. Second, the Conference seeks to analyse whether and how the recent Political Economy of Punishment literature may be related to the texts on neoliberalism and punishment and to those which are focused on the cultural and political elements of the contemporary penal trends. Last, but not least, the Conference is aimed at examining to what extent the Political Economy of Punishment literature may contribute to critically analyse the evolution of penality since the onset of the so-called Great Recession.

Therefore, we will consider contributions on a wide range of issues that encompass the broad theme of The political economy of punishment today: Visions, debates and challenges, particularly on the themes of:

 

  • Variants of capitalism and punishment: versions and relations
  • Contemporary transformations of capitalism and penality: postfordism, neoliberalism, etc.
  • Great Recession and penal policies
  • Econonmy, culture, politics and punishment: Theoretical tools, dialogues and conflicts

 

 

Keynote speakers:

Leonidas Cheliotis (University of Edinburgh, Scotland, UK)

Alessandro De Giorgi (San Jose State University, USA)

Dario Melossi (University of Bologna, Italy)

Máximo Sozzo (National University of the Litoral, Argentina)

Richard Sparks (University of Edinburgh, Scotland, UK)

 

Organization:

ECRIM, University of A Coruna, Spain (www.ecrim.es)

Academic chairs: José Ángel Brandariz (University of A Coruna, Spain), Máximo Sozzo (National University of the Litoral, Argentina) and Dario Melossi (University of Bologna, Italy)

Organizing committee chair: Patricia Faraldo (University of A Coruna, Spain)

 

Abstract guidelines:

Proposals should be titled and should not exceed 250 words. Please include the proposer’s name and contact details along with his or her university affiliation.

Please submit abstracts via email to: dcastrolinares@gmail.com

The papers presented at the workshop may be eventually published in a book containing the workshop proceedings.

 

Closing date: 15 June 2014

Decisions about the acceptance of the papers will be made by the end of June 2014.

 

 

 

 

The political economy of punishment today:

Visions, debates and challenges

Congreso Internacional

18-19 de septiembre de 2014

Facultad de Derecho, Universidad de A Coruña

A Coruña, España

 

 

CALL FOR PAPERS

 

A lo largo de la última década, una pluralidad de textos ha intentado analizar las recientes transformaciones de la penalidad, en particular el encarcelamiento masivo, a través de herramientas conceptuales de la Economía política. Esta literatura, que es claramente heterogénea tanto en perspectivas como en conclusiones, ha contribuido a actualizar el marco teórico de la Economía política de la pena, que fue capital para relanzar el pensamiento crítico sobre la pena en los años 70 y 80. A mayor abundamiento, estos textos recientes han coincidido en el tiempo con el desarrollo de una línea teórica que pretende explicar el incremento de la punitividad de las últimas décadas desde el punto de vista de la emergencia del neoliberalismo, entendido como proyecto político y como doxa económica. Frente a ello, otro sector relevante de la literatura académica ha tendido a enfatizar los elementos culturales y/o políticos de la evolución de la penalidad –así como sus variaciones-, marginando en cierta medida el análisis de  Economía política.

Partiendo de este contexto teórico, resulta especialmente oportuno reflexionar sobre la actual situación del campo analítico de la Economía política de la pena, desde las perspectivas plurales que surgen de estas nuevas aportaciones en la materia.

Por ello, el Congreso pretende discutir si tales textos recientes están conformando nuevos instrumentos teóricos para el análisis económico-político de la pena. En segundo lugar, el Congreso analizará si -y cómo- puede ponerse en relación la literatura reciente sobre Economía política de la pena con los textos sobre neoliberalismo y penalidad y con los que se centran en los componentes culturales y políticos de las tendencias punitivas contemporáneas. Por último, el Congreso pretende reflexionar sobre en qué medida la literatura sobre Economía política de la pena puede contribuir a analizar críticamente la evolución de la penalidad desde el inicio de la denominada Gran Recesión.

En consonancia con todo ello, se tomarán en consideración contribuciones centradas en un diversas cuestiones que se integran en el amplio marco de The political economy of punishment today: Visions, debates and challenges, en particular en los siguientes temas:

·         Variantes del capitalismo y penalidad: versiones e interrelaciones

·         Transformaciones contemporáneas del capitalismo y penalidad: postfordismo, neoliberalismo, etc.

·         Gran Recesión y políticas punitivas

·         Economía, cultura y pena: herramientas teóricas, diálogos y conflictos

 

Keynote speakers:

Leonidas Cheliotis (Universidad de Edimburgo, Escocia, Reino Unido)

Alessandro De Giorgi (Universidad estatal de San Jose, EE.UU.)

Dario Melossi (Universidad de Bolonia, Italia)

Máximo Sozzo (Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Argentina)

Richard Sparks (Universidad de Edimburgo, Escocia, Reino Unido)

 

Organización:

ECRIM, Universidad de A Coruña, España (www.ecrim.es)

Coordinadores académicos: José Ángel Brandariz (Universidad de A Coruña, España), Máximo Sozzo (Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Argentina) y Dario Melossi (Universidad de Bolonia, Italia)

Coordinadora del comité organizador: Patricia Faraldo (Universidad de A Coruña, España)

 

Instrucciones para los resúmenes de los textos:

Las propuestas deben tener título, y no deben exceder de 250 palabras. Deben incluirse el nombre del proponente, así como los datos de contacto y la universidad de pertenencia.

Los resúmenes de los textos deben enviarse por correo-e a: dcastrolinares@gmail.com

Los textos presentados en el seminario pueden ser ulteriormente publicados en un libro que contenga los resultados del Congreso.

 

Fecha límite: 15 de junio de 2014.

La decisión sobre la aceptación de los textos se tomará a fines de junio de 2014.

 

International Conference “Beyond Neoliberalism? Politics and Punishment in Contemporary Societies”

Monday, October 7th, 2013

The Law School of the University of A Coruña hosted on 3-4 October an International Conference, organised by the ECRIM research group and entitled “Beyond Neoliberalism? Politics and Punishment in Contemporary Societies”.

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From left to right, Máximo Sozzo, Richard Sparks

The first day of the Conference (Thursday, October the 3rd) began with a lecture given by Richard Sparks (University of Edinburgh, UK), entitled “What’s going on? Some legitimation problems of the ‘neo-liberal’ penality”.

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From left to right, José Ángel Brandariz, David Vila, Manuel Maroto, Máximo Sozzo

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From left to right, David Vila, David Soto, José Ángel Brandariz, Máximo Sozzo

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From left to right, Ignacio Mendiola, José Ángel Brandariz

Richard Sparks’ lecture was followed by a panel session on “Sovereignty, Governmentaly and Punishment”. The panel began with a presentation given written by David San Martín (University of La Rioja, Spain) and David Vila (University of Zaragoza, Spain) on “Austere Government and Mundane Sovereignty”. Then David Soto (University of A Coruña, Spain) presented a paper written by Borxa Colmenero (University of A Coruña, Spain) on “Bio-politics and sovereign power in Spain: Continuities and discontinuities in the new political cycle”. The session also hosted a presentation given by Ignacio Mendiola (University of the Basque Country, Spain) on “The role of torture in the neoliberal regime” (Presentation).

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From left to right, Luz María Puente, Emma Bell

The Conference continued with a lecture given by Emma Bell (University of Savoy, France) reflecting on “There is an alternative: Challenging the logic of neoliberal punishment”.

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From left to right, Luz María Puente, Daniel Jiménez

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Among others, Luz María Puente, José Ángel Brandariz, Máximo Sozzo, from left to right

A panel session on “Great Recession and Criminal Justice” followed Emma Bell’s lecture. A presentation on “Punish and discipline? Penitentiary Jubilee and extended expulsion in the Iberian neo-liberalism”, given by Daniel Jiménez Franco (University of Zaragoza, Spain), opened the panel. Then José Ángel Brandariz (University of A Coruña, Spain) presented a paper on “Great Recession and Criminal Justice: Bad times for criticism?” (Presentation).

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From left to right, Luz María Puente, Alejandro Forero, Rita Faria

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From left to right, Luz María Puente, Claudio González, Rita Faria

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From left to right, Luz María Puente, Rita Faria, Claudio González

The first day of the Conference finished with a third panel session, entitled “Neoliberal Penality, Social Harm and Economic Crime”. The panel hosted a presentation given by Alejandro Forero (University of Barcelona, Spain) on “New ‘crisis’ and the production of harm: Which ungovernability?”. Then Claudio González (University of Malaga, Spain) lectured on “The influence of neoliberalism in Latin America’s criminal justice systems: The construction of a managerial paradigm in Chile and Costa Rica”. Finally, Rita Faria (University of Porto, Portugal) closed the panel presenting a paper on “Crisis, crime and criminology: Reflection on harms caused by the economic crisis and economic crimes in Portugal”.

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From left to right, Patricia Faraldo, José Ángel Brandariz, Leonidas Cheliotis, Máximo Sozzo

The second day of the Conference began with a lecture given by Leonidas Cheliotis (University of Edinburgh, UK), entitled “Pessimism of the Intellect, Optimism of the Will: Redefining the Contours of Neoliberal Penality”.

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From left to right, Ignacio González, Máximo Sozzo

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From left to right, Manuel Maroto, Ignacio González, Máximo Sozzo, Richard Sparks

Leonidas Cheliotis’ lecture was followed by a panel session on “Great Reecession, Resistance and Punishment”. In the framework of this panel, Ignacio González (Complutense University of Madrid, Spain) presented a paper on “Penalizing the Protest: Neoliberalism and the management of resistances”. Discussing on the same topic, Manuel Maroto (University of Castilla La Mancha, Spain) gave a presentation on “Criminal justice and the repression of political dissent: Some current trends in Spain”.

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From left to right, Patricia Faraldo, Máximo Sozzo

The last lecture of the Conference was given on 4 October by Máximo Sozzo (National University of the Litoral, Argentina), reflecting on “Beyond the punitive turn? Postneoliberalism and punishment in Argentina”.

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From left to right, Máximo Sozzo, Anabella Museri, Alejandra Otamendi

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From left to right, Luz María Puente, Alejandra Otamendi

In order to also examine the contours of penality in Latin America, Máximo Sozzo’s lecture was followed by a panel session which gathered two presentations given by Argentinian researchers. On the one hand, Anabella Museri (CELS, Argentina) presented a paper written by her and Paula Litvarchky entitled “Breaks and continuities in Criminal Justice: The reform of the flagrancia concept in Buenos Aires province”. On the other hand, Alejandra Otamendi (University of Buenos Aires, Argentina) gave a presentation on “Public support of punitive policies at the Metropolitan Area of Buenos Aires (2000-2010)”.

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From left to right, José Ángel Brandariz, Miguel Abel

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From left to right, José Ángel Brandariz, Santiago Ruiz, Miguel Abel

The last panel session of the Conference hosted two fairly different presentations, gathered under the title “Neoliberal Penality Issues”. First, Miguel Abel (University of Santiago de Compostela, Spain) presented a paper on “Beyond Neoliberalism? Politics and punishment in money laundering” (Paper). Thereafter, Santiago Ruiz (Complutense University of Madrid, Spain) gave a presentation on “The citizen (in)security in the neoliberal era: The case of Lavapiés”.

Beyond Neoliberalism? Politics and punishment in contemporary societies. International Conference (3-4 October, A Coruña)

Monday, September 16th, 2013

Beyond Neoliberalism? 

Politics and Punishment in Contemporary Societies

International two-day conference

3-4 October 2013

Law School, University of A Coruña

A Coruña, Spain

 In recent years, a prominent piece of academic literature has analysed the transformations in the field of punishment through the lens of what has been called neoliberalism. Several theoretical perspectives, such as the governmentality studies, or a variety of analysis on post-welfarist punishment, have highlighted the influence of economic policies and the neoliberal mode of government on the recent evolution of penal policies.

These theoretical frameworks appear to be especially relevant to face the current challenges of the field of punishment and social control. Yet, a crucial historical event has further strengthened the interest of this sort of analysis. In effect, the study of punishment from the perspective of politics and political economy has gained momentum with the beginning of what has been termed the Great Recession. The conference is focused on this theoretical field, and it is aimed to reflect on punishment both in relation to and beyond neoliberalism.

 Keynote Speakers:

Emma Bell (University of Savoy, France)

Leonidas Cheliotis (University of Edinburgh, Scotland, UK)

Richard Sparks (University of Edinburgh, Scotland, UK)

Máximo Sozzo (National University of the Litoral, Argentina)

Organization:

ECRIM, University of A Coruña, Spain (www.ecrim.es)

Academic chairs: José Ángel Brandariz (University of A Coruña, Spain), Máximo Sozzo (National University of the Litoral, Argentina)

Organizing committee chair: Patricia Faraldo (University of A Coruña, Spain)

Secretary: David Castro (University of A Coruña, Spain)

 ******

 En los últimos años, un importante sector de la literatura académica ha analizado las transformaciones en el campo de la penalidad en relación con la emergencia de lo que se ha dado en llamar neoliberalismo. Desde los estudios sobre la gubermentalidad hasta una pluralidad de análisis sobre la penalidad post-welfarista han llamado la atención sobre la influencia de la política económica y el modo de gobierno neoliberal sobre la evolución reciente de las políticas penales.

Este ámbito de análisis se intuye especialmente relevante para dar respuesta a interrogantes básicos del ámbito punitivo y, más general, del control social. No obstante, un hecho histórico crucial ha venido a reforzar el interés de ese análisis. En efecto, lo que se ha denominado la Gran Recesión reclama un análisis de la penalidad desde el ámbito de la Política y de la Economía Política. Este es el campo de estudio en el que se enmarca el presente congreso, orientado a pensar el castigo desde, y más allá, del neoliberalismo.

 Conferenciantes invitados:

Emma Bell (Universidad de Saboya, Francia)

Leonidas Cheliotis (Universidad de Edimburgo, Escocia, Reino Unido)

Máximo Sozzo (Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Argentina)

Richard Sparks (Universidad de Edimburgo, Escocia, Reino Unido)

Organización:

ECRIM, Universidad de A Coruña, A Coruña, España (www.ecrim.es)

Coordinadores académicos: José Ángel Brandariz (Universidad de A Coruña, España), Máximo Sozzo (Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Argentina)

Coordinadora del comité organizador: Patricia Faraldo (Universidad de A Coruña, España)

Secretaría: David Castro (Universidad de A Coruña, España)

 Beyond Neoliberalism? Programme

 

Curso de Verano de prevención de blanqueo

Tuesday, July 5th, 2011

De izqda. a dcha.: Gumersindo Guinarte, Javier Fernández Teruelo, Luz María Puente, Gregorio Alonso

De izqda. a dcha.: Gumersindo Guinarte, Javier Fernández Teruelo, Luz María Puente

De izqda. a dcha.: Gumersindo Guinarte, Javier Fernández Teruelo

Gumersindo Guinarte

De izqda. a dcha.: Gonzalo Quintero, Antonio Roma

De izqda. a dcha.: Gonzalo Quintero, Antonio Roma, Luis Manuel Uriarte, Juan Manuel Vega

Gonzalo Quintero

Los días 4, 5 y 6 de julio, la Facultad de Derecho de la Universidad de A Coruña acogió la celebración de un Curso de Verano de prevención de blanqueo, organizado por la empresa Global Chase, en colaboración con el grupo de investigación ECRIM. El curso ha reunido a una quincena de ponentes de diversos ámbitos (académicos, jurídicos, profesionales, policiales), especializados en el análisis y la persecución del blanqueo de capitales. En su parte más propiamente académica, el curso se inició con sendas mesas redondas sobre “La represión penal del blanqueo de capitales“. En la primera de ellas, y tras la presentación del curso realizada por Gregorio Alonso Bosch, de la empresa Global Chase y coordinador del curso, y por Luz María Puente Aba, profesora de Derecho penal de la Universidad de A Coruña, intervinieron Gumersindo Guinarte Cabada, profesor titular de Derecho penal de la Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, y Javier Gustavo Fernández Teruelo, profesor titular de Derecho penal de la Universidad de Oviedo.

Posteriormente, la materia de la represión penal del blanqueo de capitales fue abordada en la mesa compuesta por Antonio Roma Valdés, Fiscal del Tribunal Superior de Xustiza de Galicia, Luis Manuel Uriarte Valiente, miembro de la Fiscalía provincial de Pontevedra, Gonzalo Quintero Olivares, Catedrático de Derecho penal de la Universidad Rovira i Virgili (Tarragona), y Juan Manuel Vega Serrano, subdirector general de Inspección y Control de Movimiento de Capitales de la Dirección General del Tesoro.

Programa del Curso

Tercera jornada Congreso Derecho penal internacional y memoria histórica

Sunday, November 28th, 2010

De izqda. a dcha.: Guillermo Portilla, Luz María Puente, Juan Antonio García Amado

De izqda. a dcha.: Juan Terradillos, Luis Rodríguez, Raquel Vañó

Juan Terradillos

De izqda. a dcha.: Juan Terradillos, Luis Rodríguez, Raquel Vañó

De izqda. a dcha.: Ana Pérez, Mónica Zapico, Antonio Girón, Santiago Macías

El viernes 26 de noviembre tuvo lugar la tercera y última sesión del Congreso sobre Derecho penal internacional y memoria histórica, organizado por el equipo de investigación ECRIM y celebrado en la Facultad de Derecho de A Coruña.

La sesión matutina se inició con la intervención del Dr. Juan Antonio García Amado (Universidad de León, España), quien disertó sobre “La memoria histórica“. Con posterioridad, el Dr. Guillermo Portilla Contreras (Universidad de Jaén, España) presentó una ponencia sobre “La consagración del Derecho penal de autor durante el franquismo: El Tribunal Especial para la represión de la masonería y el comunismo“. Tras él intervino el Dr. Juan Terradillos Basoco (Universidad de Cádiz, España), con una ponencia sobre “La Ley de Memoria histórica española de diciembre de 2007“. La sesión concluyó con la presentación de la comunicación sobre “¿Justicia justa? El desafio de género de la justicia transicional“, por parte de Raquel Vañó Vicedo (Universidad de Valencia, España).

La sesión vespertina comenzó con la intervención de la Dra. Ana Pérez Machío (Universidad del País Vasco, España), sobre “Las mujeres en las cárceles españolas durante la dictadura“. Posteriormente intervino Santiago Macías Pérez, miembro de la Asociación para la Recuperación de la Memoria Histórica (ARMH). La sesión concluyó con la proyección del documental “La voz a ti debida” (2009), precedida por una presentación a cargo de su director, Antonio Girón Serrano.

Segunda jornada Congreso Derecho penal internacional y memoria histórica

Sunday, November 28th, 2010

De izqda. a dcha.: Isidoro Blanco, Raúl Zaffaroni

De izqda. a dcha.: Isidoro Blanco, Raúl Zaffaroni, Carlos Martínez-Buján

De izqda. a dcha.: Raúl Zaffaroni, Carlos Martínez-Buján

De izqda. a dcha.: Raúl Zaffaroni, Agustina Iglesias, Ana Messuti

De izqda. a dcha.: Cristina Fernández-Pacheco, José Antonio Ramos, Mónica Zapico

De izqda. a dcha.: José Antonio Ramos, Mónica Zapico, Encarnación La Spina, Isabel Lirola

El jueves 25 de noviembre tuvo lugar la segunda jornada del Congreso sobre Derecho penal internacional y memoria histórica, organizado por el equipo de investigación ECRIM y celebrado en la Facultad de Derecho de la Universidad de A Coruña.

La sesión matunina se inició con la intervención del Dr. Isidoro Blanco Cordero (Universidad de Alicante, España), sobre “El principio de jurisdicción universal en el ordenamiento jurídico español y su reciente modificación“. Posteriormente, el Dr. Eugenio Raúl Zaffaroni (Universidad de Buenos Aires, Argentina), ministro de la Corte Suprema de la República Argentina, disertó sobre “La aplicación del principio de jurisdicción universal: el caso argentino“. La mañana se cerró con la intervención de Ana Messuti (Universidad de Salamanca/Universidad de Buenos Aires, España/Argentina), quien presentó una ponencia sobre “Una querella contra el franquismo en la Argentina“.

La sesión vespertina comenzó con la ponencia de la Dra. Cristina Fernández-Pacheco Estrada, sobre “La experiencia de los Tribunales penales internacionales: de Nuremberg a la Corte Penal Internacional“. Tras ella intervino la Dra. Isabel Lirola Delgado (Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, España), disertando sobre “La Corte Penal Internacional de La Haya: Luces y sombras“. Con posterioridad presentó su comunicación Encarnación La Spina (Universidad de Valencia, España), sobre “¿Hacia un ‘nuevo’ perfil de justicia penal internacional? Una retrospectiva“. La sesión de tarde concluyó con la intervención de Mónica Zapico (Universidad de A Coruña, España), sobre “¿Es posible la peresecución penal de los crímenes del franquismo? La instrucción de las causas“.

Primera jornada Congreso de Derecho penal internacional y memoria histórica

Wednesday, November 24th, 2010

Sesión de presentación de comunicaciones


De izqda. a dcha.: José Luis De la Cuesta, Patricia Faraldo, Alicia Gil


De izqda. a dcha.: Alicia Gil, Custodia Jiménez

El 24 de noviembre se ha celebrado la primera sesión del Congreso de Derecho penal internacional y memoria histórica, organizado por el equipo de investigación ECRIM, y celebrado en la Facultad de Derecho de la Universidad de A Coruña.

En la sesión matutina se ha realizado la presentación de comunicaciones, a cargo de ocho investigadoras/es de una pluralidad de universidades españolas, brasileñas y colombianas.

La sesión vespertina se ha iniciado con la intervención del Dr. José Luis de la Cuesta Arzamendi (Universidad del País Vasco, España, y Presidente de la Asociación Internacional de Derecho penal), sobre “El Derecho penal internacional“. Posteriormente ha realizado su intervención, sobre “Los crímenes internacionales“, la Drª. Alicia Gil Gil (UNED, España). La sesión se ha cerrado con la presentación de una comunicación titulada “¿Se puede recurrir a la fórmula de Radbruch en delitos por autoría mediata con aparatos organizados de poder?” por parte de Custodia Jiménez Martínez, doctoranda en Derecho penal y Criminología de la UNED (España).


Congreso de Derecho penal internacional y Memoria histórica

Tuesday, October 12th, 2010

El Congreso de DERECHO PENAL INTERNACIONAL Y MEMORIA HISTÓRICA. Desafíos del pasado y retos del futuro en la protección de los Derechos Humanos, organizado por el Área de Derecho penal de la Universidad de A Coruña, pretende abordar el análisis de las problemáticas de más actualidad y relevancia del Derecho penal internacional, como son la Corte penal internacional o el principio de jurisdicción universal, al mismo tiempo que aborda el estudio de la Memoria Histórica y la revisión jurídica del pasado, haciendo especial referencia al caso español y las posibilidades o no de investigar penalmente los crímenes del franquismo. La realización del Congreso permitirá una aproximación científica a dos cuestiones singulares de la ciencia del derecho penal, así como el diálogo y debate con especialistas internacionales en la materia.

Lugar: Facultade de Dereito, Campus de Elviña, s/n, A Coruña
Fechas: 24-26 de noviembre de 2010

URL: http://congreso-dpimh.site50.net/