IMG_0209Chiara Perini

[ENG] On April, 24-28, Prof Chiara Perini, Associate Professor of criminal law at the University of the Insubria (Italy), visited the Law School of the University of A Coruna. During her visit, which was sponsored by the research group ECRIM, Prof Perini gave a number of lectures on corporate criminal law at our Law School. More precisely, she lectured on ‘Corporate crime against safety at work: the Italian model‘, ‘Corporate crime against the environment: the implementation of Directive 2008/99/EC in Italy‘, and ‘Corporate crime: the Italian system according to D.Lgs. 231/2001‘. Chiara Perini thereby reflected on the current strengths and shortcommings of the legal regulation of corporate crime in Italy, by comparatively examining the EU legal framework as regards to this kind of criminal offences.

IMG_0210Chiara Perini

 

IMG_0201Michele Burman

[ENG] Michele Burman, Professor of Criminology and Head of the School of Political and Social Sciences of the University of Glasgow (Scotland) visited the Law School of the University of A Coruna to chair the workshop ‘Women, Crime and Justice in a Changing Europe‘ of the ESC working group on Gender, Crime and Justice. During her visit, Prof Burman kindly accepted the invitation of the ECRIM to give a lecture within the criminology course of the English Programme of the Law School. She gave a talk on young women’s offending, in which she delivered a wide overview on the criminological theories that seek to explain the involvement of women in criminal activities.

IMG_0203Michele Burman

 

CARTEL Women Crime and Justice_env2-page-001

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[ENG] On April, 24-25, the Law School of the University of A Coruña hosted the workshop ‘Women, Crime and Justice in a Changing Europe‘. This academic meeting was sponsored by the working group on Gender, Crime and Justice of the European Society of Criminology, and co-organised by the ECRIM, together with the co-chairs of the ESC working group, Loraine Gelsthorpe (University of Cambridge, England) and  Michele Burman (University of Glasgow, Scotland).

The 2-day workshop gathered around 30 scholars, who debated on a wide variety of Gender and Justice topics, such as violence against women, the experience of imprisoned women, trafficking in human beings, sex work and prostitution and reproductive rights. Additionally, a general meeting of the working group was held during the workshop.

 

IMG_0071

From left to right: Elaine Player, Elaine Genders

On Monday, April 24, the workshop wa opened with a session called ‘Women in Prison‘. In this panel, Elaine Genders (University College London, England) and Elaine Player (Kings College London, England) presented a paper on ‘Post Brexit: Implications for the safe delivery of psychologically intrusive rehabilitative interventions in women’s prisons‘.

 

IMG_0080Anabel Cerezo

The topic  was subsequently addressed by Anabel Cerezo (University of Málaga, Spain), who
reflected on ‘Women Prisoners and Health: The Implementation
of Bangkok Rules to the Spanish Prison Legislation‘.

 

IMG_0084Ana Ballesteros

Ana Ballesteros (University of Barcelona, Spain) also focused on the situation of female inmates in Spain, by presenting a paper on ‘Responsibilisation and female imprisonment in
contemporary penal policy: “Respect Modules”
(“Módulos de Respeto”) in Spain‘.

 

IMG_0095Rachel Goodhill

The second papel session was entitled ‘In Search of Social Justice’. It began with a presentation made by Rachel Goldhill (University of Portsmouth, England), and called ‘Two steps forward, 3 steps back. A study of
community provision for women service users in England and Wales‘.

 

IMG_0100Anne-Marie Slotboom

Anne-Marie Slotboom (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam, The Netherlands) eventually debated the process of desistance from crime from the perspective of female offenders.

 

IMG_0101Fátima Pérez

Finally, this panel session included a presentation made by Fátima Pérez (University of Málaga, Spain), who evaluated the penal policies implemented in Spain to prevent violence against women.

IMG_0106Lorea Arenas

Lorea Arenas (University of Málaga, Spain) opened the third panel session, which was focused on domestic abuse. The Spanish scholar presented a paper on ‘GPS and domestic violence in Spain‘.

 

IMG_0116Emma Forbes

This presentation was followed by the talk given by Emma Forbes (University of Glasgow, Scotland), who debated the impact of Devolution, Brexit, and the post-Brexit political context in the penal policies against domestic abuse
in Scotland.

 

IMG_0119General meeting of the ESC working group on Gender, Crime and Justice

IMG_0127General meeting of the ESC working group on Gender, Crime and Justice

IMG_0129

General meeting of the ESC working group on Gender, Crime and Justice

A general meeting of the ESC working group on Gender, Crime and Justice was also held on Monday, April 24. In this meeting the participants organised several panels to be sponsored by the working group in the upcoming Cardiff conference of the ESC, as well as began to prepare both an special issue of an academic journal and a collective book on gender and justice issues.

 

IMG_0136From left to right: Michele Burman, Loraine Gelsthorpe

IMG_0143

From left to right: Patricia Faraldo, Michele Burman, Loraine Gelsthorpe

The general meeting of the working group was followed by a master class given the organisers of the workshop, Loraine Gelsthorpe (University of Cambridge, England), Michele Burman (University of Glasgow, Scotland), and Patricia Faraldo (University of A Coruna, Spain). The senior scholars provided an audience of PhD students and early-career reseachers a number of most helpful hints on how to write a PhD Dissertation and how to publish in international journals.

 

IMG_0148Sílvia Gomes

The second day of the  workshop was opened by a session entitled ‘Analysing gender‘. Sílvia Gomes (University of Minho, Portugal), presented a paper entitled ‘When gender violence is in the news: theoretical reflections and practical dilemmas‘.

 

IMG_0162Silvia Rodríguez

Within this panel session, the ECRIM member Silvia Rodríguez (University of A Coruna, Spain) gave a talk on ‘A Gender-Based Analysis of Human Trafficking Cases in Spain‘.

 

IMG_0169Ana Guerreiro

Finally, this session included as well a paper presented by Ana Guerreiro (ISMAI, Portugal), who examined the participation of women and the role played by female offenders in criminal organisations.

 

IMG_0178Martina Althoff

The second panel session of this day was comprised by two presentations. First, Martina Althoff (University of Groningen, The Netherlands) presented a paper on ‘What about women’s self-determination and prostitution policy? An assessment of the Dutch and Swedish legislation and its effects‘.

 

IMG_0186Monika Platek

Second, Monika Platek (University of Warsaw, Poland) gave a talk entitled ‘When reproductive rights become a crime. Not only case of Poland‘.

 

IMG_0192From left to right: Oona Brooks, Luz María Puente

The last session of the workshop was called ‘Responding to Violence
Against Women‘ and included three presentations. On the one hand, Oona Brooks (University of Glasgow, Scotland) presented a paper on ‘Contemporary developments in rape advocacy: a view from victims/survivors‘.

 

IMG_0198From left to right: Janine Janssen, Luz María Puente, Sheila Fernández and Oona Brooks

IMG_0196From left to right: Janine Janssen, Luz María Puente

On the other hand, Sheila Fernández (Autonomous University of Chile, Chile / University of A
Coruna, Spain) debated its paper called ‘Indigenous women and violence against women.
Proposals from Latin America‘. Finally, the workshop was closed by the presentation made by Janine Janssen (Avans University, The Netherlands), who explored honour-based violence from the perspective of virtual and social media.

 

TRIPTICO Women Crime and Justice_env2 (1)-page-001

 

 

TRIPTICO Women Crime and Justice_env2 (1)-page-002

 

IMG_20170403_180013

De izqda. a dcha.: María Digna Braña, Antonio Doval, Patricia Faraldo, Patricia Tapia

[CAST] Los días 3-4 de abril, el Iltre. Colegio de Abogados de A Coruña acogió la celebración de las Jornadas “La proyección de la corrupción en el ámbito penal: Su prevención y represión mediante el recurso a la sanción penal, organizadas por el ECRIM y el Iltre. Colegio de Abogados.

La primera sesión del seminario, el lunes 3 de abril, comenzó con una conferencia del Dr. Norberto De la Mata Barranco, Catedrático de Derecho Penal de la Universidad del País Vasco, sobre “La lucha contra la corrupción política desde el Derecho penal”. Con posterioridad, el Dr. Fernando Navarro Cardoso, Profesor de Derecho penal de la Universidad de las Palmas de Gran Canaria disertó sobre “El delito de cohecho pasivo”.

En la segunda parte de la sesión de tarde, el Dr. Antonio Doval Pais, Catedrático de Derecho penal de la Universidad de Alicante, analizó “El delito de maquinaciones para alterar los precios de las cosas”. El primer día de las Jornadas concluyó con la intervención de la Dra. Patricia Tapia Ballesteros, Profesora de Derecho penal de la Universidad de Valladolid, quien presentó una ponencia sobre “Corrupción y tráfico de drogas: la responsabilidad penal del funcionario de prisiones”.

IMG_0043De izqda. a dcha.: María Digna Braña, Antonio Roma, Luz María Puente

La segunda sesión de las jornadas, el martes 4 de abril, se inició con la ponencia “Corrupción y factores precipitadores: intento de definición”, presentada por la Dra. María Acale Sánchez, Catedrática de Derecho penal de la Universidad de Cádiz. Tras ella intervino D. Antonio Roma Valdés, Fiscal de la Fiscalía de Área de Santiago de Compostela, quien examinó “La persecución de los delitos de corrupción: las dificultades de cooperación internacional en los paraísos fiscales”.

Tras el descanso, la Dra. Irene Navarro Frías, Doctora en Derecho penal y Profesora de Derecho Mercantil de la Universidad de la Laguna, abordó el análisis de la “Corrupción en las sociedades de capital: el problema de la retribución de los administradores sociales”. Finalmente, las jornadas concluyeron con la intervención del abogado D. Esteban Rico Núñez, quien presentó una ponencia sobre “La tutela judicial efectiva y la inversión social de la carga de la prueba en las macroinvestigaciones sumariales”.

IMG_20170404_121401De izqda. a dcha.: Marián Fuentes, Silvia Rodríguez, Patricia Tapia, Luz María Puente, María Acale, Irene Navarro

 

IMG_0062Sílvia Gomes

 

[GAL] Na semana do 3 ao 7 de abril, a Facultade de Dereito da Coruña recibiu como profesora visitante a Sílvia Gomes, investigadora da Universidade do Minho (Braga, Portugal), e profesora de criminoloxía do ISMAI (Maia, Portugal). Durante a súa estadía, a Dra. Gomes impartiu diversas palestras e aulas a estudantes de criminoloxía e penoloxía, centrándose en particular na análise empírica da prisión e das súas condicións de vida, e na problemática de reinserción e da retorno á sociedade tras o cumprimento dunha pena de prisión.

 

IMG_0066Sílvia Gomes

IMG_0016Antonella Pasculli

 

[ENG] Antonella Pasculli, Professor of criminal law at the University of Bari (Italy) has been visiting lecturer at the Law School of the University of A Coruna during the fourth week of March. During her ECRIM-sponsored visitorship, Prof Pasculli has given a number and talks and lectures to students of penology and criminology. More precisely, Prof Pasculli lectured on ‘Organized crime and economic crisis in Italy‘ and ‘The protection of children in migrations‘.

 

IMG_0024Antonella Pasculli

IMG_0010Maria João Guia

[GAL] Entre o 20 e o 24 de marzo, a Facultade de Dereito da Coruña contou como profesora convidada coa Dra. Maria João Guia, investigadora en Socioloxía e Criminoloxía da Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal), profesora da Universidade Autónoma de Lisboa (Portugal) e coordinadora da CINETS – Crimmigration Control International Network of Studies. Durante o decurso da semana, a Dra. Guia impartiu varias aulas a palestras sobre a criminalización da inmigración e a relación entre inmigración prisión.

 

IMG_0015Maria João Guia

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[CAST] El ECRIM organiza los próximos 3-4 de abril, en colaboración con el Iltre. Colegio Provincial de Abogados de A Coruña, las jornadas “La proyección de la corrupción en el ámbito penal: Su prevención y represión mediante el recurso a la sanción penal“, que se celebrará en la sede del Colegio Provincial de Abogados de A Coruña. Las jornadas, que contarán con la participación de diversos ponentes del mundo académico y del ámbito de la práctica del Foro, analizarán desde una pluralidad de puntos de vista la problemática de la respuesta penal a la corrupción.

Programa

Lunes 3 de Abril de 2017

16.30hs – Presentación de la 1ª Jornada.

Dña. Patricia Faraldo Cabana, Catedrática de Derecho Penal de la Universidade da Coruña (UDC)

Dña. María Digna Braña Iglesia, Abogada y Directora de la EPJ “Decano Iglesias Corral”

16.45hs – “La lucha contra la corrupción política desde el Derecho Penal”

Norberto De la Mata Barranco, Catedrático de Derecho Penal de la Universidad del País Vasco (UPV)

17:15hs – “El delito de cohecho pasivo”

Fernando Carlos Navarro Cardoso, Profesor Titular de Derecho Penal de la Universidad de las Palmas de Gran Canaria (ULPGC)

17.45hs – Descanso.

18.00hs – “El delito de maquinaciones para alterar los precios de las cosas”

Antonio Doval Pais, Catedrático de Derecho Penal de la Universidad de Alicante (UA)

18.30hs – “Corrupción y tráfico de drogas: la responsabilidad penal del funcionario de prisiones”

Dña. Patricia Tapia Ballesteros, Profesora Ayudante Doctora de Derecho Penal de la Universidad de Valladolid (UVa)

19.00hs – Debate.

19.30hs – Cierre de la 1ª Jornada.

 

 Martes 4 de Abril de 2017

16.30hs – Presentación de la 2ª Jornada.

Dña. Luz María Puente Aba, Profesora Contratada Doctora de Derecho Penal de la Universidade da Coruña (UDC)

16.45hs – “Corrupción y factores precipitadores: intento de definición”

Dña. María Acale Sánchez, Catedrática de Derecho Penal de la Universidad de Cádiz (UCA)

17:15hs – “La persecución de los delitos de corrupción: las dificultades de cooperación internacional en los paraísos fiscales”

Antonio Roma Valdés, Fiscal adscrito a la Fiscalía de Área de Santiago de Compostela

17.45hs – Descanso.

18.00hs – “Corrupción en las sociedades de capital: el problema de la retribución de los administradores sociales”

Dña. Irene Navarro Frías, Profesora Ayudante Doctora de Derecho Mercantil de la Universidad de la Laguna (ULL)

18.30hs – “La tutela judicial efectiva y la inversión social de la carga de la prueba en las macroinvestigaciones sumariales”.

Esteban Rico Núñez, Abogado

19.00hs – Debate.

19.30hs – Cierre de la 2ª Jornada.

 

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17265174_593962347460995_8501790406609474967_nEmanuele La Rosa

 

[ENG] From March, 12 to March, 16 Prof Dr Emanuele La Rosa visited the Law School of the University of A Coruna. Prof La Rosa is a Senior Lecturer of criminal law at the Mediterranean University of Reggio Calabria (Italy). During his visit, which was sponsored by the ECRIM research group, Prof La Rosa gave a number of talks and lectures, focusing on prison overcrowding in Italy, the increasing enforcement of non-custodial penalties and the penal treatment of mentally impaired offenders.

 

17352433_593962304127666_3409646018904532455_nEmanuele La Rosa

Jornada insolvencias

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

[CAS] El ECRIM ha organizado, en colaboración con el Iltre. Colegio de Abogados de A Coruña, la jornada titulada “Los delitos de frustración de la ejecución e insolvencia punible a revisión“. La jornada, celebrada en la sede del Colegio, contó con la participación de diversos ponentes, tanto del mundo de la abogacía como del campo académico.

Tras la presentación a cargo de la Dra. Eva María Souto García, miembro del ECRIM, y de María Digna Braña Iglesia, abogada y directora de la Escuela de Práctica Jurídica, correspondió a la Dra. Patricia Faraldo Cabana la primera ponencia, titulada “Los delitos de frustración de la ejecución: análisis de su regulación y problemáticas destacadas“. Posteriormente intervino el Dr. Iván Navas, profesor de Derecho penal de la Universidad de San Sebastián (Santiago, Chile) e investigador visitante en la UDC, que presentó la ponencia “Los delitos de insolvencia punible: la imputación objetiva y el delito concursal“. Finalmente, la sesión se cerró con la intervención de Pedro Moreno Vázquez, abogado especializado en Derecho mercantil y Derecho penal económico del Iltre. Colegio de A Coruña, quien realizó un “Análisis de la posible relevancia penal y concursal de las conductas del deudor a través de la resolución de casos prácticos“.

3_2De izq. a dcha.: Patricia Faraldo, Pedro Moreno, Iván Navas

6_2De izq. a dcha.: Pedro Moreno, María Digna Braña, Eva Souto, Patricia Faraldo, Iván Navas

2_2Iván Navas

[CAST] El ECRIM ha acogido durante el mes de febrero de 2017 la estancia de investigación, de una semana de duración, de Iván Navas Mondaca, profesor de Derecho penal de la Universidad de San Sebastián (Santiago, Chile). El Dr. Navas, adenás de la realización de una conferencia, trabajó durante su estancia en la protección penal de los consumidores, con vistas a la próxima formulación de un proyecto de investigación.

[ENG] Dear members of the ESC Working Group on Gender and Justice

‘Women, Crime and Justice in a Changing Europe’ 24th and 25th April 2017

 Whilst we realise that this is fairly short notice, we are very pleased to announce that there will be a meeting and mini-conference for the ESC Working Group on Gender and Justice to be held on 24th and 25th April 2017  at the Universidad A Coruña in Galicia, Spain.

The theme of the mini-conference  is ‘Gender, Crime and Justice in a Changing Europe’ and we invite titles and abstracts for short papers which address this  core theme.

 Whilst the  European Union has long championed gender equality, and has been at the forefront of initiatives in relation to  violence against women, there has nonetheless been a noticeable gap in relation to debates and policies concerning women,  crime and justice.  Within a context of  economic crisis and fragility, Europe faces major challenges and is undergoing monumental change.  Many countries in Europe are seeing massive cuts in pubic services, reductions in health and social care, rising food and transport costs and increased rates of unemployment. Patterns of forced migration and flows of people through and across Europe pose great challenges. Some countries face huge  debts and are imposing wide ranging cuts on  public spending and health and welfare services. Poverty and social exclusion are  increasing. Support services are diminishing. These  conditions, taken together, pose  immense  challenges to  political systems. But they also  create the social and economic conditions which give rise to crime and the disproportionate criminalisation of certain groups.  At the same time,  many countries are witnessing rising rates of female imprisonment and reduced access to alternative forms of punishment.  What are the implications of a changing Europe for achieving justice for women ?   We therefore welcome papers on any aspect of women,  crime  and justice in a changing Europe.

 As well as allowing for an opportunity to meet outside the confines of the ESC annual conference, this  mini-conference will  provide a forum for encouraging encourage debate and analysis on the important topic of women  and justice in Europe, but will also  allow us an opportunity to hear about each others’ work, plan  future Working Group activities and general networking. The event will take place at the Universidad A Coruña, and will be hosted by Professor Patricia Faraldo Cabana and her colleagues in the Law School. The  conference accommodation will be in the delightful  city of A Coruña in the northwest of Spain. 

 Thanks to the generosity of the universities of A Coruña  and of Cambridge, there are no costs to attend the event and there are  funds available to cover accommodation costs in A Coruña for two nights for up to 30 people.  However, there are no funds to cover the  travel costs of delegates, although a limited number of travel bursaries will be available to assist PhD  researchers  to attend.

 If you would plan  to attend this event please can you register interest  to michele.burman@glasgow.ac.uk by 1st March 2017  clearly marking your email  ‘ESC WG Gender and Justice A Coruña’  so we can make the accommodation bookings and plan for a set number of attendees.. If you plan to  present a paper then please  can you send in the title and abstract  to the same address no later than  12th  March 2017. Details of the programme will be circulated to attendees no later than March 31st 2017.

 If you are a PhD student or a postdoctoral student and  have no other recourse to funds to allow you to attend, and  wish to apply for a travel bursary then please submit a short application,  providing the details below, along with a short reference letter from a supervisor. Preference will normally be given to those wishing to travel outside their country of residence: 

 Name:

University:

Current role (PhD/PostDoc):

Anticipated costs of travel:  

Principal reason for wishing to attend: 

Title of  paper you plan to present:

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José Ángel Brandariz. La Opinión de A Coruña/casteleiro/roller agencia

[GAL] José Ángel Brandariz, membro do ECRIM, foi obxecto de varias entrevistas en medios de comunicación, con ocasión do seu recente nomeamento por un periodo de tres anos como membro do Executive Board da European Society of Criminology.

Esta é a entrevista realizada e publicada polo diario La Opinión de A Coruña o 8 de febreiro de 2017.

“Xuízos coma o dos tuits de Carrero Blanco teñen un efecto devastador, de censura”

“Pensar que a realidade pode mudar a través do Código Penal é un exercicio de ignorancia” – “Nos últimos cinco anos o 20% da poboación penitenciaria saíu da cadea”

miguel rodríguez a coruña 08.02.2017

O profesor de Dereito Penal da Universidade da Coruña, José Ángel Brandariz, vén de ser elixido membro do consello directivo da Sociedade Europea de Criminoloxía por un periodo de tres anos. Será o único representante do Estado español na directiva deste organismo comunitario que se encarga de desenvolver un traballo “prosaico”: poñer en contacto aos investigadores europeos centrados en analizar as características da criminalidade e o tipo de respostas se lle dan. Nesta entrevista, analiza a situación desta disciplina en España e opina sobre a fronteira que separa o combate á delincuencia e a liberdade de expresión

Din que os estudos de criminoloxía en España están moito máis retrasados do que noutros países europeos. En que se materializa ese retraso?

-Temos un déficit moi chamativo do aproveitamento de saberes expertos por parte dos operadores públicos. En Inglaterra, que é un país moi avanzado neste sentido, hai xa 50 anos que todo o referido a seguridade, orde pública, criminalidade e delincuencia se decide desde o ámbito gubernativo apoiándose en asesores que, dunha ou outra forma, repensan as políticas que se poñen en marcha, ven como funcionan, etc. Iso é unha realidade que no contexto español non existiu nunca, salvando o caso de Euskadi e Cataluña.

-A que se debe esta carencia?

-Eu creo que a dúas ou tres cuestións evidentes. Primeiro, a un certo déficit xeral das ciencias sociais no ámbito académico español en relación a outros países da nosa contorna. En segundo lugar, á convicción bastante bizarra de que este tipo de problemas se solucionan só desde a perspectiva do dereito. E a terceira razón, no caso español, a un déficit de innovación e investimento político en pensar como se solucionan estes problemas.

Cada certo tempo ábrese o debate sobre a suposta “suavidade” do Código Penal español despois dalgúns episodios de violencia. Endurecelo é unha solución?

-O Código Penal español é o máis duro de Europa occidental, xunto con Portugal. Máis alá diso, na Unión Europea só nos supera Rumanía. Pensar que a realidade se cambia a través do Código Penal é un exercicio de ignorancia ou de fetichismo normativo. Non hai ningunha persoa que cometa delitos que lle preste a máis mínima atención ao Código Penal. As políticas desta área teñen que facer máis cousas que reducir a criminalidade e pensar en como atallar comportamentos antisociais que non están criminalizados. Aí está a trascendencia que teñen cada vez máis as ordenanzas cívicas nas nosas cidades á hora de mellorar a convivencia, a cohesión social, a conflictividade, reducir o medo ao outro, etc. Todos estes son elementos que están relacionados cos comportamentos antisociais e coa criminalidade pero que teñen autonomía propia e hai que intervir neles con políticas propias. No caso español hai moi pouco feito neste terreo e hai moito por innovar.

En 2015 o Goberno reinstaurou a cadea perpetua en España. Estase espallando unha especie de populismo punitivo?

-Non creo que esteamos na etapa de maior populismo punitivo. Iso viviuse antes da crise, hai uns quince anos. Si que é certo que se restableceu a cadea perpetua despois de 87 anos de non existir pero tamén é certo que nos últimos cinco anos o 20% da poboación penitenciaria saíu do cárcere. Non é unha cuestión menor. Normalmente, un determinado problema non se cambia só a través da lei. A lei é un compoñente pero non é un compeñente relevante. Por exemplo, o último gran problema criminal que tivo España foi a etapa de criminalidade vinculada á heroína. O Código Penal tivo un papel pouco significativo naquilo. Foron unha serie de condicións sociais, económicas e mesmo culturais as que deixaron atrás esa etapa. Algunhas moi fastidiadas, como puido ser a difusión da SIDA, e outras máis neutras, como o cambio das prácticas sociais en relación ao consumo de drogas.

Están de actualidade as condenas por tuits, coma a que se propón polos comentarios sobre Carrero Blanco ou do líder de Def Con Dos. A súa razón de ser é que “lexitiman o terrorismo”. Que lle parecen estas decisións?

-Isto evidencia que é fácil deslizarse por unha pendente pero desandar o camiño é complicado. En determinado momento créase unha norma para criminalizar un comportamento pensando que só se aplicará en casos excepcionais pero iso acaba convertíndose en regra. É moi fácil aprobar unha norma que criminaliza comportamentos e despois é moi difícil que haxa un goberno con valor político para poder dicir “non, señores, isto non vai por aquí”. Desde unha perspectiva xa máis neoliberal, paréceme pouco eficiente no gasto dos recursos humanos.

-En que sentido?

-Ningún sistema penal se pode dedicar a perseguir toda a criminalidade, polo que hai que priorizar. Hai países que desatenden a violencia de xénero mentres que nós consideramos que é algo moi grave e que hai que atendela. Hai que preguntarse cales son os crimes graves que se dan na nosa sociedade e preguntarnos se queremos gastar en cousas coma os tuits recursos de xuízos, investigacións, policías, etc. Máis alá dunha cuestión de dereitos e de liberdade de expresión, que son claves nesta cuestión, paréceme que hai unha lóxica de eficiencia. Que tipo de sociedade somos cando dedicamos recursos que son escasos e que costan moito en perseguir cousas como esta?

-Que efecto teñen este tipo de condenas sobre o exercicio da liberdade de expresión?

-Ten un efecto bastante devastador. Éo para a persoa que é condenada, que non entende moi ben en que tipo de país está vivindo, e o é na medida en que todos somos conscientes de que está acontecendo isto para o conxunto da colectividade. A medida busca intentar que o uso das redes sexa o menos denigrante posible, pero o efecto que teñen este tipo de comportamentos non é ese. É un efecto de censura que vai máis alá do comportamento que pode ser criminalizado e que retrae a moitas persoas a producir unha dinámica de debate colectivo en tempo real, que é do que se trata nas redes sociais. Os efectos que pode ter, sen ninguna dúbida, son moito máis gravosos do que beneficiosos para a sociedade.

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[GAL] Na última semana de xaneiro, o ECRIM ten acollido na Facultade de Dereito da Coruña a estadía de Clara Masiero, doutoranda en Dereito penal da UNISINOS (Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil) e profesora de Dereito penal da Universidade Paulista (São Paulo, Brasil) e das Faculdades Integradas Campos Salles (São Paulo, Brasil). A investigadora brasileira desenvolveu a súa estadía no marco da realización da súa tese doutoral, sobre “Lutas sociais e políticas criminais: o tratamento penal dos conflitos sociais gerados pela discriminação no Brasil“.

giorgi_chakvetadze_photoGiorgi Chakvetadze

[ENG] The Law School of the University of A Coruna is hosting, from September 4, 2016 to December 3, 2016 visiting scholar Giorgi Chakvetadze, sponsored by the ECRIM research group. Prof. Chakvetadze is an Assistant Professor of Criminal Law at the Tbilisi State University, Georgia. He is currently writing his PhD Dissertation on mens rea in criminal law from an international perspective. During his stay at our Law School, Prof. Chakvetadze has examined the concept of mens rea in continental European law.

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Alessandro Melchionda

[CAST] La Facultad de Derecho de A Coruña contó con la presencia, el miércoles 26 de octubre, del Dr. Alessandro Melchionda, como profesor invitado de la asignatura Derecho sancionador del Estado. El Dr. Melchionda es Catedrático de Derecho penal de la Universidad de Trento (Italia). Alessandro Melchionda impartió una sesión sobre “La reincidencia: Perspectiva comparada“, en la que abordó el tratamiento, jurídico-penal pero también criminológico, de la problemática de la reincidencia en diversos sistemas penales europeos.

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Rita Faria

[GAL] A Facultade de Dereito da Universidade da Coruña contou coa presenza, como profesora de Criminoloxía convidada polo ECRIM, da Drª. Rita Faria, profesora de Criminloxía de Universidade do Porto (Portugal). Rita Faria deu aulas os días 28-29 de setembro, nos que abordou as “Teorias crminologicas sobre o delito e o delinquente“, e “Uma explicação para a delinquência juvenil: teoria do “drift” e técnicas de neutralização“. Posteriormente, a Drª. Faria deu aulas de Criminoloxía na Facultade de Dereito da Coruña os dias 26-27 de outubro, nos cales centrouse na análise criminolóxica da delincuencia de colariño branco. Mais específica, impartiu aulas sobre “White-collar crime“, e “Causas de impunidade do white-collar crime“.

 

Spiral notebook with some accutraments such as wooden pencil, mechanical pencil and a sharpener

[ENG] WATER CRIMES project to hold first European workshop

Early next month, the WATER CRIMES project will hold both a European Workshop on Water Crimes and a project mid-term meeting.

The European Workshop on WATER CRIMES will be held on November 10–11, 2016 in A Coruna, Spain. The workshop is first gathering of experts in the field and proposes to establish a meeting point for experts from all over Europe in order to define water crime. The works also includes designing a threat-and-risk assessment. The project consortium is expecting experts from government institutions, academia, research institutions and international organisations from all EU member states,as well as the United States and Australia.

The WATER CRIMES Project consortium will also hold its mid-term meeting to discuss stages of progress and various points of the ongoing project activities on November 09-10 in the premises of the University of A Coruna.

A detailed programme of the workshop can be found in the draft agenda.

The European Workshop on Water Crimes is organised within the framework of the WATER CRIMES project, which started in January 2016 and is co-funded by the Internal Security Fund of the European Union. The primary aims of the project are to provide the first strategic analysis of crimes against water resources in Europe and to advance the knowledge in this field through: a) making an inventory of the various forms of crime that threaten this fundamental good, its management, the related supply chains and infrastructures; b) analysing the potential impact and the risk of these crimes in Europe; c) developing mid-term outlook of the trends of these crimes in Europe; d) making policy recommendations for mitigating strategies.

For contact details and more information about the activities and partners in this research project, please visit our website www.watercrimes.eu.

 

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[CAS] Luis Rodríguez Moro, miembro del ECRIM y Profesor de Derecho penal de la Universidad de Cádiz, acaba de publicar un nuevo libro, titulado “La pena de privación del derecho a conducir vehículos a motor y ciclomotores” (Valencia: Tirant lo Blanch, 2016).

El libro analiza en profundidad la pena de privación del derecho a conducir vehículos a motor y ciclomotores: tanto su contenido y configuración como pena principal en el Código Penal como su duración, forma de ejecución y consecuencias de su incumplimiento. Aborda también el análisis de los efectos previstos en la Ley de Seguridad Vial de 1990 para la pérdida del permiso de conducir por la pérdida de todos los puntos del carnet, que constituyen parte del contenido aflictivo de la pena, en variable medida, según los casos. Escrito con espíritu utilitario y crítico, el texto pretende analizar si esta pena, con su configuración y forma de aplicación actuales, más que un simple castigo, constituye una herramienta preventiva útil, entre otras, para incentivar, educar y contramotivar a la ciudadanía en general y a los conductores ya infractores en particular, y si cumple, así, con la importantísima tarea de reducir los elevados índices de siniestralidad y mortalidad viales.

SUMARIO

I.INTRODUCCIÓN

II.LA MULTIFUNCIONALIDAD DE LA PRIVACIÓN DEL DERECHO A CONDUCIR: PENA, MEDIDA DE SEGURIDAD Y SANCIÓN ADMINISTRATIVA DE TRÁFICO

III.LA PENA DE PRIVACIÓN DEL DERECHO A CONDUCIR

1.Determinaciones previas sobre el papel del Derecho Penal en la protección de la seguridad vial y reflexiones sobre su consideración como parte de una respuesta combinada a la siniestralidad vial

1.1. El papel del Derecho penal en la protección de la seguridad vial

1.2. El Derecho Penal como parte de una respuesta combinada, normativa y preventiva, a la siniestralidad vial

2.Naturaleza jurídica y fines de la pena

2.1. Naturaleza jurídica: la privación del derecho de conducir vehículos a motor como “pena privativa de derechos” y como “pena principal”

2.2. Fines de la pena de privación del derecho a conducir vehículos a motor y ciclomotores

3.Presupuestos y criterios de aplicación: delitos a los que se aplica

3.1. El delito de negativa a someterse a las pruebas legalmente establecidas para la comprobación de las tasas de alcoholemia y la presencia de drogas tóxicas, estupefacientes y sustancias psicotrópicas en la conducción del art. 383 CP

3.2. El delito de conducción a velocidad excesiva del art. 379.1 CP

3.3. El delito de conducción bajo la influencia de drogas tóxicas, estupefacientes, sustancias psicotrópicas o de bebidas alcohólicas del art. 379.2 CP

3.4. Los delitos de conducción temeraria del art. 380 CP y de conducción homicida del art. 381 CP

3.5. Los delitos de homicidio y lesiones por imprudencia grave y menos grave de los arts. 142.1, 152.1, 142.2 y 152.2 CP

3.6. Consideraciones comunes a estas figuras delictivas y breve referencia a los delitos contra la seguridad vial para los que no se recoge la aplicación de la pena de privación del derecho de conducir vehículos a motor

4.Duración

5.Contenido

6.Forma de ejecución

7.Consecuencias del incumplimiento de la pena

8.Nivel de aplicación práctica

IV.CONCLUSIONES

V.BIBLIOGRAFÍA

 

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General overview of the participants of the Conference

 

 

[ENG] On September 15-16, the Law School of the University of A Coruna hosted the International Conference ‘Crises, Economy and Punishment: The Influence of the Great Recession on Crime and Penality‘. The Conference was organised by the ECRIM research group, in collaboration with Máximo Sozzo (National University of the Litoral, Argentina) and Russell Hogg (Queensland University of Technology, Australia) and it gathered around 45 scholars from a wide variety of American, Australasian, and European countries.

The Conference began with a plenary session in which Dario Melossi (University of Bologna, Italy) reflected on “The Prison and the Factory Revisited: Penality and the Critique of Political Economy”.

Two parallel sessions ensued this lecture. Parallel session no. 1 (“Crime and Penality 1”) included the presentations: “Crime and punishment in Brazil: Is restorative justice a suitable alternative to prison in the context of the (late) economic crisis?” (Daniel Achutti and Raffaella Pallamolla, UniLasalle, Brazil); “While the crisis had not yet arrived: mass incarceration in times of social inclusion in the Brazilian democracy” (David S. Fonseca, Queensland University of Technology, Australia), and  “Economic crisis, politics, and punishment: impacts and influences in the Brazilian case” (Bruno Rotta-Almeida, Federal University of Pelotas, Brazil). Parallel session no. 2 (“Political violence, torture and penal policies”) was formed by the talks: “The releasement of Arnaldo Otegi as a vanishing point for the analysis of the past and present exceptionalism trends in terrorism crime policies in Spain” (David Castro-Liñares, University of A Coruna, Spain); “Contours, resistances and limits of the so-called ‘Global War on Terrorism’: The (controversial) persistence of the enemy within the European Union” (Borxa Colmenero-Ferreiro, David Soto-Díaz and David Castro-Liñares, University of A Coruna, Spain), and  “To say the impossible, to imagine the unimaginable: the punitive experience of torture” (Ignacio Mendiola, University of Basque Country, Spain).

The morning session ended with the talk given by Máximo Sozzo (National University of the Litoral), who lectured on “Punishment and economic and social crises. Puzzling relations?”.

Parallel session no. 3 and 4 were carried out in the afternoon of September 15. Parallel session no. 3 (“Crises and Penality II”) integrated the presentations: “Six Years On: Reflections on the decline in the Spanish prison population and the post-crisis criminal justice system” (José A. Brandariz-García, University of A Coruna, Spain); “A different approach to understand the imprisonment rate decrease in the Netherlands” (David Soto-Díaz and Silvia Rodríguez-López, University of A Coruna, Spain); “Economic crisis and reduction of the prison population: the Italian case” (Giovanni Torrente, University of Turin, Italy), and “Studying the penal system in times of crises: conceptual, empirical and political challenges” (Ignacio González-Sánchez, University of Girona, Spain). Parallel session no. 4 (“Policies of migration control”) comprised the papers: “Who has been deported from Spain during the economic crisis? Some answers from a feminist and post-colonial perspective” (Cristina Fernández-Bessa, University of Barcelona, Spain); “Detention Centers for Foreigners: Punishing Undocumented Migrants by the Deprivation of Liberty in the Schengen Area” (Nerea Galdós-Pozo, University of A Coruna, Spain); “The deportation of foreigners in the Chilean criminal justice system: A technique of ‘actuarial justice’?” (Roberto A. Dufraix-Tapia, Arturo Prat University, Chile), and “Detaining migrants in times of crisis in Italy: Undeportability, discipline, and the differential inclusion” (Giulia Fabini, University of Bologna, Italy).

These parallel session were followed by a lecture given by Russell Hogg (Queensland University of Technology, Australia), who talked about “The Financialization of Society and the Monetization of Justice: Crime, Punishment and the Global Financial Crisis”.

Finally, the first day of the Conference came to an end with a panel session devoted to “Penological Issues: Community, Control and Penality, that included the presentations: “Neo-liberalism and changes in the role of European alternatives to imprisonment” (Daniela Ronco and Michele Miravalle, University of Turin, Italy); “What reentry? Prisoners’ expectations and perceptions about life inside and outside prison” (Sílvia Gomes, University of Minho, Portugal); “Social exclusion, digital technology and ‘smartpowers’” (Javier Cigüela,  Abat Oliba University-CEU, Spain), and  “State Violence and Economic Crises in Men and Women’s Prison: Discourses in the Portuguese Press” (Luísa Saavedra, Eunice Seixas, Miguel Cameira and Ana Margarida Silva, University of Minho, Portugal).

The second day of the Conference began with a plenary session, in which Patricia Faraldo-Cabana (University of A Coruna, Spain) lectured on “Do economic crises influence the use of fines? Revisiting Rusche and Kirchheimer’s Punishment and Social Structure”, and Marcelo F. Aebi (University of Lausanne, Switzerland) presented a paper on  “Why the financial crisis led to a decrease of prison populations in Europe?”.

The Conference continued with two parallel sessions. Parallel session no. 7 (“Neo-liberalism, Political Economy and Penality I”) included the presentations: “Itinerary of the issue of security since neoliberalism return in Argentina” (Gabriela Seghezzo and  Nicolás Dallorso, University of Buenos Aires-CONICET, Argentina); “Crisis and Economics of Crime and punishment in Argentina” (Diego Zysman-Quirós, University of Buenos Aires, Argentina); “The reorganization of ‘repression’ during the Great Recession: the Antiterrorism Act and the Anti-picketing Protocol in today’s Argentina” (Juan Cruz Goñi, National University of Lanús, Argentina), and “Media and political discourse on juvenile crime in Brazil: culture, economy and punishment” (Marília de Nardin Budó, Faculdade Meridional, Brazil, and Riccardo Cappi, State University of Bahia/State University of Feira de Santana, Brazil). Parallel session no. 8 (“Neo-liberalism, Political Economy and Penality II”) comprised the papers: “The limits of political economy in understanding criminalization” (António P. Dores, ISCTE-IUL, Portugal); “From project exile to mass delivery of pain: How many of us are being abandoned?” (Daniel Jiménez-Franco, University of Zaragoza, Spain), and “Institutional anomie and the Portuguese system of justice” (José N. Cruz, University of Porto, Portugal).

The second morning of the Conference finished with two additional parallel sessions. Parallel session no. 9 (“Managerialism, Crime Prevention and Penality”) integrated the presentations: “Towards an ‘Austere Prevention’? Impact of Austerity Policies on Crime Risk Management in the Field of Gender Violence in Spain” (David San Martín-Segura, University of La Rioja, Spain), and “Banal prevention of insecurity as a way of governance: A perspective from Madrid” (Sergio García-García and Débora Ávila-Cantos, Complutense University of Madrid, Spain). Parallel session no. 10 (“Political Economy and Penality: Reflections on organised crime”) was formed by four presentations: “The Yakuza and the reasons of its longevity” (Martina Baradel, University of London, United Kingdom); “Economic crisis and Organized Crime in Italy” (Antonella Pasculli, University of Bari, Italy); “The Business of Human Trafficking in Times of Economic Crisis: Implications for the Criminal Liability of Legal Persons” (Silvia Rodríguez-López, University of A Coruna, Spain), and “The North-South shipment of toxic waste as a new phenomenon of criminality of the powerful” (María A. Fuentes-Loureiro, University of A Coruna, Spain).

After the lunch break, the last parallel session of the Conference were carried out. Parallel session no. 11 (“Penality Issues”) was integrated by the presentations: “Explaining the differences in the application of detention for juvenile offenders in Spain” (Beatriz Cruz-Márquez, University of Cádiz, Spain); “Crisis and Neoliberal Hegemony in the European Union: Consequences in Criminal Law” (Jorge Correcher-Mira, University of València, Spain), and “Americanization of the penalty, populist punitiveness and security: recent proposals in the justification of the punishment” (Elena Górriz-Royo, University of Valencia, Spain). Parallel session no. 12 (“Corporate crime, corruption and penality”) was comprised by the papers: “Advantages and risks of self-regulation policies and corporate internal investigations” (Ana M. Neira-Pena, University of A Coruna, Spain); “Anticorruption discourses and neoliberalism” (Manuel Maroto-Calatayud, University of Castilla-La Mancha, Spain), and “Consequences of the prosecution of Icelandic bankers following the bank collapse in 2008” (Sigur?ur Tómas Magnússon, University of Reykjavik, Iceland).

A final plenary session closed the Conference. This last panel encompassed the lectures: “Beyond the Punitive Turn: The Sources of Transformation in the Post-Rehabilitative Prison: European and American Perspectives. Part I: Europe” (Elena Larrauri-Pijoan, Pompeu Fabra University, Spain), and “Beyond the Punitive Turn: The Sources of Transformation in the Post-Rehabilitative Prison: European and American Perspectives. Part II: US” (Jonathan Simon, University of California-Berkeley, United States).

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From left to right: Máximo Sozzo, Russell Hogg, Carmen Garcimartín, Patricia Faraldo, José Ángel Brandariz

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From left to right: Máximo Sozzo, Dario Melossi

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From left to right: David Castro, Borxa Colmenero, Daniel Jiménez

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Ignacio Mendiola

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From left to right: Ignacio González, Daniel Achutti, David Fonseca, Bruno Almeida, Luísa Saavedra

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Bruno Almeida

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From left to right: Russell Hogg, Raffaella Pallamolla, Diego Zysman

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From left to right: Diego Zysman, Ignacio González, Daniel Achutti

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Máximo Sozzo

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From left to right: Silvia Rodríguez, David Castro, Russell Hogg

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General overview of Ignacio González’s presentation

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From left to right: Giulia Fabini, Marián Fuentes, Roberto Dufraix, Cristina Fernández, Nerea Galdos

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From left to right: Luz María Puente, Russell Hogg

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From left to right: Silvia Rodríguez, Daniela Ronco, Michele Miravalle

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From left to right: Silvia Rodríguez, Luísa Saavedra

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From left to right: Javier Cigüela, Luísa Saavedre, Sílvia Gomes, Daniela Ronco, Michele Miravalle

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From left to right: Marcelo Aebi, Patricia Faraldo, Kerry Carrington

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From left to right: Marcelo Aebi, Patricia Faraldo, Kerry Carrington

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From left to right: António Dores, Cristina Fernández

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Daniel Jiménez

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José Cruz

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From left to right: Débora Ávila, Ignacio González, Juan Goñi, Marília Budó, Gabriela Seghezzo, Diego Zysman

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From left to right: Débora Ávila, David San Martín, Daniel Jiménez

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From left to right: Marián Fuentes, Antonella Pasculli, Martina Baradel, Silvia Rodríguez

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Ana Neira

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Manuel Maroto

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Sigurdur Magnússon

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From left to right: Jorge Correcher, Silvia Rodríguez, Elena Górriz

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From left to right: Elena Larrauri, José Ángel Brandariz

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Jonathan Simon